Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone

Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone

We have a small space, the size of a small closet, right off our interior garage door. As soon as we walk into our house, we take off our shoes, jackets, hats, and bags. It’s the perfect location for a drop zone, but it’s quite small and the builder-grade version wasn’t built-out to its full potential. When I first approached the idea of making over our modern farmhouse drop zone, I measured it all and then used graph paper to sketch my design. I considered our family’s needs and the size I had to work with to create a practical design. Thinking bigger and better, I redesigned the sketch on graph paper and felt ready to move forward on my modern farmhouse DIY drop zone.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone – Video Tutorial


The only problem troubling me is that I was worried about cutting all the plywood correctly. Cut too small, it’s possibly unusable for this project. Cut too large… well let’s just say it’s very aggravating for an impatient person to have to recut the same piece two or even three times. It was stressing me out. My table saw is difficult for me to use, and it would take a lot of measuring, checking angles, marking boards, and cutting plywood with my circular saw to get each piece correct. It made me wonder if the trouble of cutting wood accurately is often a deterrent to some DIYers like myself. I love DIYing and the risk of wrong cuts is really stressful to me. But luckily, I stumbled upon Ana White’s Shelf Help website.

Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone – Shelf Help Now


I designed each box separately which adds stability and makes it easier to assemble and lift into place.

When I originally found the site and was thrilled to use her free design tool to help me design the entire modern farmhouse DIY drop zone. Forget the graph paper hassle and counting all those darn squares, her Shelf Help design tool was thrilling to say the least. Then I realized that once designed, I could order the plywood pieces needed to assemble my design. The Shelf Help website is easy to navigate and straight forward. Each step in the process has it’s own section where Ana gives direction and tips for that step of the process. That’s how I knew to design my drop zone units a little smaller width than the drop zone space. This is because wall aren’t usually perfectly square and you can use finish trim pieces to cover any gaps and give your built-in a professional look. She also advises to leave some space at the top so that you don’t damage the ceiling when installing the top box – a trim piece along the top covers the gap anyway.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone
Once we enter the house through the garage, this is our new view! It feels so good to have an organized space to store our everyday items.

The other amazing thing about ordering Shelf Help’s custom cut plywood is that the front side of each piece is finished which is a huge bonus and time saver for the DIYer. When you order your design, you can then download each design to see how the pieces will be assembled. Using the downloaded design makes assembly fool proof and seamless. Then you only need to make sure that all the finished fronts are facing the same side and that you drill your pocket holes in the correct placement.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone

For Shelf Help designs, all you need is a pocket hole jig to securely fasten your pieces together. I have used my Kreg Pocket Hole Jig for many projects now and I can’t imagine not having it. The jig comes with easy instructions and all the bits you’ll need to drill the pocket holes and then fasten the Kreg screws. For the Shelf Help plywood, I used 1.25″ Kreg screws (be sure to not over-drive your screws and check the torque setting). Ana gives directions and tips for assembling your built-in boxes, information on how to build doors and drawers, stabilize the boxes, installation, and more. The plywood is nice too and shipped so quickly that I was amazed it could be cut and shipped so timely.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone

Our modern farmhouse DIY drop zone was a big project, especially for one person, but having Shelf Help to design my space and cut the wood was a major advantage to progressing this project along. Once all the boxes were assembled and secured with 1×3″ bay supports, I could move forward with priming and painting them as well as my shiplap backdrop boards. I wanted the back of the coat box to have a decorative look and some detail – shiplap was it for me. I used Kilz 2 primer, and Sherwin Williams 6208 Pewter Green with an additive to smooth out brush strokes.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone

At this point, I was ready to demo the existing drop zone and prep the area for installation. I had to get my stud finder out and make sure I took care attaching the boxes to the wall studs for a secure installation. I purchased several sizes of shims to fit in between my boxes and the wall. If you don’t use shims, you box will shift when you screw it into the stud. Jeremy helped me shim the entire drop zone. He would test out different sizes to get a snug fit, then I would saw the piece so that it lined up with the edge. Each box was then predrilled with a counter-sink bit so that the screw would be flush. I used 3.5″ screws to install the boxes to the studs. The boxes are also screwed together to add more stability and to prevent bowing.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone
I used the Kreg shelf pin jig to easily drill these pin holes for my adjustable shelves. This top cabinet will be concealed with doors.

Once all four boxes were level, shimmed, and secured into the wall studs, I patched the screw holes with DAP DryDex Spackling and once dry sanded them smooth. I like the time-indicator spackle so that I know when it’s safe to sand and paint. Be sure to clean the surface of dust after sanding, before you paint. My next step was building the face frame using 1×2 primed pine boards. Shelf Help directs you to assemble the face frame all together with some pocket holes connections and then set it in place to secure with brad nails. Because of my baseboards and ceiling fixtures, I couldn’t preassemble. So, I cut the outside face frame boards the full length of the built-in and then measured, cut, and installed the horizontal boards.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone

All my face frame boards were painted with two coats and then installed with a brad nail gun and 1.25″ nails. Then I patched the holes with spackle, let dry, cleaned the surface, and painted the spots. With the face frame in place and painted, there are just a few more steps to finalize our modern farmhouse DIY drop zone. To protect the shoe shelves, I ordered custom cut acrylic to line the shelves. I also measured and marked the coat hook placement and installed these eight hooks. We quickly realized that instead of making the top shoe shelves into drawers, we would use the space for our much needed shoe storage and Jeremy can places his keys and wallet in the little basket within the hat cubbies.


Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone

Modern Farmhouse DIY Drop Zone – Shop this space

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links!


My original plan was to build cabinet doors for the top box. The top box will be for seasonal storage that we want unseen. However, to properly make doors, I would need a router, a router table, and bits to cut the joints. At this point, I’m not going to invest is this specific equipment and instead I’ll order custom doors to fit my box. The doors will be ordered very soon and I’ll post more photos on Instagram when they’re installed~

So, with the last finishing touches well on their way, it is so amazing to have the drop zone completed and in use. It’s so nice to have this area as a space to organize the things we use daily. I couldn’t imagine creating this built-in without the help of Shelf Help Now – and now I can’t wait to redesign our pantry space! Do you have a space that you’d like to add a built-in to? Let me know in the comments below.

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DIY vintage farmhouse dining table - Arhaus copycat

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat

Before I dive into sharing my DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat with you, I think I should begin by admitting to you that I’ve been drooling over the Arhaus Francis Dining Table for quite a while, but I knew the price tag was outside my budget. I searched for copycats, even tables with skinny turn-style legs, with no luck in the price-tag department. Beautiful tables are expensive, this shouldn’t be shocking, but it was disappointing. Ultimately, we decided to purchase a modern farmhouse style table for our daily dining needs (for durability, affordability, and style) and we love that our $800 table extends longer to suit more guests and it has a simple design with a pretty finish. However, I couldn’t stop admiring the Francis from afar, wondering how long before someone may sell one on Marketplace (probably never). That’s when I decided that I could possibly make my own turn-style leg farmhouse table, and maybe even achieve a similar finish to the gorgeous Francis.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table - Arhaus copycat

Speaking of copycats, Pottery Barn also has a similar designed table, but it’s a console and not large enough to function as a full dining table, and also not in my budget. In my desperate quest to acquire a table like the Arhaus Francis, I also found the Bordeaux by Parker Gwen as well as the Rancher’s dining table by Alley Exchange. These tables are gorgeous, but still out of my budget. With the willingness and determination to DIY my own table, I was able to make a DIY vintage farmhouse dining table – Arhaus copycat for about $350 – that includes all the wood, screws, sandpaper, stains, and wax. I already had some items (i.e., wood conditioner, Kreg pocket hole jig, and other tools). However, it took some time to determine how to get the stain color the exact color and look that I wanted. I tried different stains and in various layers until I finally landed onto an easy process that produces a gorgeous weathered vintage look and color. You could add some aging and distress marks to this table, but I needed my top to have a smooth surface, so I just kept it simple. You could also router the table top edge to get that elegant curve the Arhaus Francis has, but I don’t have that tool yet.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat – Examples:


To encourage my dream of having a vintage farmhouse table like the Arhaus Francis, I found the large turn-style legs on Etsy. Maybe they’re elsewhere, possibly at local millwork shops, but I thought I might cry when I found them on Etsy at a great price, by a highly rated seller, and in the exact measurements that would work for my project. It was at that moment that I knew I would build my own table with these legs, even if it was difficult, and I purchased them on the spot. My DIY vintage farmhouse dining table – Arhaus copycat will be used as our games/arts and crafts table upstairs in our bonus space. I wanted a table upstairs that we can leave our projects out on without having to worry about cleaning it all up before dinner. I also wanted a light-weight table that didn’t cost a lot, and looked nicer than one of my plastic six-foot folding tables.



DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat

To further my Arhaus Francis table copycat aspirations, I found two tutorials that I loved and felt confident that I could replicate. This tutorial, by Jen Woodhouse, is what I followed to create the base of my table. And this tutorial, by Ana White, is what I used to create my table top. The whole table isn’t terribly heavy at all, but to make moving it upstairs easier, I waited to attach the top once it went upstairs. It’s much easier to move the two pieces one at a time and it saved my walls from dings. The top is attached using corner braces which also allow the wood to shrink and expand as wood does. This will reduce the chance of the wood splitting and cracking as well. Overall, I’m so happy with the two designs that I selected and feel like they created a very beautiful DIY vintage farmhouse dining table – Arhaus copycat! My YouTube video is coming – you can subscribe to my channel and click the bell button to get alerts so you know when it’s been published!


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table - Arhaus copycat

One of the things I love about this simple and straight forward table design is that you can customize the width and length for your needs and specifications. Maybe you have a more narrow dining area, or maybe you need a more square table to fit your space – you can customize the measurements and follow the tutorial concepts for your own build. When you DIY your own dining table, you can make all those changes and customize the finish color you want too. Whether you paint or stain a table, you’ll definitely want to seal the top with polyurethane. It cures safely to eat off of, and you can get a satin or glossy finish, depending on your style and needs. I went with satin even though semi-gloss would wipe easier – I wanted that aged vintage look without a modern vibe.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table - Arhaus copycat
These photos are pretty washed out, but it was so sunny out I had a hard time getting good shots. These show off the white wash though, but in real life the color is much warmer and farmhouse toned.

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat – Tutorials:

Here is the plan I followed to build the base. Moore Family Farmhouse Table Design. However, Jen’s table legs are smaller so I adjusted the location of the legs against the aprons to be one inch from the outside of the leg instead of 3/4″. Otherwise, I followed Jen’s cut instructions to build the base.

And here is the tutorial to build the light-weight table top using affordable off-the-shelf boards. Ana White YouTube. One of the benefits of using these thinner boards is that they’re already milled and will butt up against each other pretty well. I began my first attempt at the table top using two inch thick boards and they had to be trimmed so that the edges would be flush, and that my friends is easier said than done. I don’t have a planer or joiner, and I’m guessing most of you don’t either. So, that’s why I love Ana’s simple tutorial using off-the-shelf boards. It’s not perfect, it’s not exact, but these boards are pretty darn close and do the job for my DIY vintage farmhouse dining table – Arhaus copycat version – I mean it’s supposed to look vintage and farmhouse so it shouldn’t be perfect, right?! These boards are so much lighter as well – it really worked out for the best.

Jen Woodhouse and Ana White are master woodworkers and DIYers that I greatly admire and look up to. They’re talented and have taught me a lot on my DIY journey. Be sure to check out their sites and subscribe for updates, they design a lot of cool projects.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table - Arhaus copycat

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat – Supply List:

Table base:

4 Modern chunky farmhouse legs

Kreg pocket-hole screws, 2.5″

Three 2″x4″, 96″ long boards

Table top:

Seven 6″x1″, 96″ long boards

Kreg pocket-hole screws, 1.25″

Sand paper (80, 120, 160, 220 grits)

4 Corner Braces

Table stain and finish:

Wood conditioner

Old Barn Living Farmhouse Stain

Whitewash

Weathered Oak Stain

White Wax

Special Dark Finishing Wax

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thanks for considering my links!


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat – Video tutorial:


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table - Arhaus copycat

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat – Staining Steps:

When it comes to finishing your table or any furniture, you want to take your time and do all the steps thoroughly. Don’t rush the steps that create the beauty of your piece. Sanding your piece with each sanding grit will give you an even and open finish for your stain. Zoe from Crafted by the Hunts explains that it’s best to sand about one square inch per second. So, take your time, cover every inch, and be sure to use each grit because they each have a job in the refining process. Start with the lowest number grit and work your way up. I started with 80, then used 120, 180, and finished with 220. You must also sand with the grain or you’ll have unsightly scratch marks. Zoe also taught me that by using a wood conditioner to prep your wood before staining will help to give you a more even stain. Of coarse proper sanding also helps with an even finish, but using a conditioner is also a must. To get the look of my finished table, you’ll want to do the following in this exact order:

  1. Sand (80, 120, 180, and 220 grit)
  2. Dust, wipe, clean the surface of any sawdust (using a tack cloth can help too)
  3. Apply wood conditioner, let sit for at least 30 minutes before staining
  4. Using a staining pad, apply the Farmhouse stain wiping it with the wood grain and immediately wipe off residual stain as you go
  5. Allow to dry (follow Old Barn Living’s instructions). Sand with a 220 grit sanding sponge and wipe clean.
  6. Using a staining pad, lightly apply one coat of whitewash stain, spreading it quickly and thinly, and wiping so there’s no residual stain sitting on wood
  7. Allow to dry (follow Varathane’s instructions). Sand with a 220 grit sanding sponge and wipe clean.
  8. Using a staining pad, apply a thin coat of weathered oak stain, wiping any residual stain off immediately
  9. Allow to dry (follow Varathane’s instructions). Sand with a 220 grit sanding sponge and wipe clean.
  10. Using a staining pad, apply one more layer of Old Barn Living’s Farmhouse stain if you need more warmth to your finish.
    Step 10 was not necessary for the table legs, but I wanted the top to match the legs, so I added one more coat of the Farmhouse stain to the top.
  11. Allow to dry (follow Old Barn Living’s instructions).
  12. If the wood is too washed out or has too cool of a tone, finish with Minwax special dark finishing wax – or apply another coat of the Farmhouse stain before adding wax. If the wood is too warm or dark, finish with the whit wax – or add another coat of the Weathered Oak stain before adding wax.
    Note: I finished the legs with white wax, and the top with dark wax. Then after curing, the top got polyurethane.
  13. Using a lint free cloth, rub on the finishing wax until the surface is covered and then 15 minutes later, buff with a dry cloth.
  14. You can also apply a top coat of satin polyurethane two days after applying the wax. The wax alone is a finish coat, but the polyurethane is a good way to give the table top a more durable finish at the very end. The white wax also imparts a light definition into the grains of the wood – it’s a beautiful way to add age and a French vintage vibe.

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table - Arhaus copycat
The photo on the right shows a better representation of the warmth in this vintage farmhouse finish. It is really pretty in-person and has so much character and depth even though I didn’t make any distress marks.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table - Arhaus copycat
The table top isn’t attached yet because it needs to be taken upstairs for its more permanent location.

In my quest to achieve a vintage farmhouse finish, I tested many stains and layers on scrap wood. It was tedious and often disappointing, but so worth it to have discovered how to get this weathered vintage look myself. I wish I could have just used one stain and maybe a finishing wax to get this look, but something this special should take a few layers and a little time. I love Old Barn Living’s one-step stain, it’s natural, goes a long ways, and the Farmhouse shade is gorgeous. One quick tip is that I gently stirred each stain before using it, I don’t shake the cans and cause air bubbles. This order of stains I used will also be done on my built-in shelves as well as a few other projects – so be sure to subscribe and stay connected as I share many more DIY and decorating projects.

I really hope that my success with this DIY Vintage Farmhouse Dining Table – Arhaus copycat encourages you to make your own table, or even stain an unfinished piece you’ve been wanting done. I was totally insecure and nervous about staining, but applying stain with a staining pad made the process feel more natural for me and if you test on a scrap piece of wood first, you can get the feel of how much stain to leave on the pad, how much pressure to apply, and how quickly you need to wipe away residual stain. Now I feel much more comfortable and confident when it comes to staining. I can’t wait to stain my floating shelves and enjoy this beautiful look again. Please let me know in the comments below what you think. Do you like the weathered vintage farmhouse stain color or do you prefer something more modern?

804 Sycamore - Amy

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Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top

Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top

As a self-proclaimed DIYer and avid crafter, it’s hard to confess this, but I barely have the patience for sewing. I even took sewing class in junior high and loved it, but the only projects that held my attention were the quick ones. I love sewing projects and hand-sewn items, but it takes a lot for me to sit down and do it myself. I have to really want something to get the motivation to sew it. I have a great admiration for those who can sew and create amazing things with their hands! However, this fabulous DIY no sew upholstered bench top is not only easy, it’s also a project that doesn’t require too many tools or skills.


Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top

This fabulous DIY no sew upholstered bench top can add a little cushion to a wooden or metal bench, a built-in seat, a piano seat, or even an outdoor porch swing. Our bonus room prompted this particular DIY because there is a strange looking built-in bench that goes from wall to wall below the windows. It’s actually a building code so that in case of a fire we can climb out the windows. I really wish the built-in part was only below the windows, but I was determined to add some functionality to this odd feature upstairs.


Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top

In regards to the bonus space upstairs, I have zoned out four separate areas to make the best use out of the large space. Be sure to subscribe to the blog so that you can get updates to this space as they happen – I have some big plans and hope to even wow my family!

Zone 1 is where the murphy bed is located – this is our guest bed and the murphy style helps us to save room when it’s not being used. I assembled it myself and it wasn’t as dreadful as I thought – but it wasn’t exactly fun either. Zone 2 is the relaxation area where we have a TV and sofa. My girls love this space and my oldest likes to use this space with her friends. Zone 3 is currently in the planning phase and it will be where I build some built-in storage and a desk. This desk is where I will record my voiceovers for my YouTube videos and even write posts when it’s too noisy downstairs. And finally, zone 4 is where the fabulous DIY no sew upholstered bench top will be used with a farmhouse table that I’m going to build. So far, I have the legs and some wood to frame my custom table – so stay tuned! The cushioned upholstered bench top will be along one side of the table for seating. This way, I only have to buy a few chairs and we can get some practical use out of the built-in bench.


Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top

I’m referring to zone 4 as the crafting corner. I hope to enjoy a lot of painting with my girls at this table (this corner has great natural light). We can do other crafts, puzzles, games… whatever tabletop activities we want to do. I’m really excited to start projects with my girls at this table and not have to worry about cleaning it up immediately because we need the table to eat or someone is coming over. I’m hoping to add a special light above this table as well, and eventually a rug. Every zone has plans and will take time, but the journey of design and decorating is what I love the most. I’m not naturally a patient person, but waiting for a design to come together is always worth the wait.


Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top – Supplies:

I found all the supplies I needed on Amazon, and I already had the plywood. And of coarse you can use any fabric of your choosing to coordinate with your personal style, but be aware that upholstery fabric will wear better and be a little thicker which helps to avoid the fabric from ripping from the staples. Walmart actually has some great deals on fabric, or you can use coupons from Michaels and Hobby Lobby too.

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thanks for considering my links!


Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top – Video:


Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top – How to steps:

  1. Determine the size of your bench or hard surface, then subtract one inch from the seat depth.
  2. Cut 1/2″ plywood, or have Home Depot cut it for you. Don’t use plywood that’s thinner if you want the staples to hold well into the wood.
  3. Place the wood onto the foam – lined up square – and trace along the foam cushion to make your cut marks. You want the foam to fit perfectly onto the wood.
  4. Use a knife or scissors to cut the foam. A serrated knife will make a mess, so I used a carving knife and it worked great.
  5. Set foam onto batting, then set wood on top of the foam. Cut enough batting so that you can fold each side up onto the wood with plenty leftover. Too much will make your bench top over-stuffed so just enough to fully cover the wood.
  6. Use an staple gun to attach the batting around each side – one side at a time, being careful to fold smoothly around the corners. Make sure batting is flat when pulled over and stapled – this is the underside of your bench top.
  7. If necessary, iron the upholstery fabric. Set bench top onto the wrong side of the fabric with the cushion side down. You will cut the fabric so that plenty of fabric is wrapped around the bench top to staple. My fabric didn’t fully cover the batting – if you don’t want any batting showing, cut enough fabric to cover.
  8. Staple each side of the fabric, one side at a time, making sure it’s pulled for a smooth finish, but not too tight. Make sure each corner is wrapped nicely with the fabric squared off. along the edges an at each corner.
  9. Cut any excess fabric off to prevent having a bulking uneven bench top, flip the bench top over, and place onto surface. You’re done, great job!

Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top

It doesn’t get much easier than that, and it didn’t take long at all. I’m even considering making a matching seat for the other side of the room near the couch and TV. I’m also considering using shiplap in several of the zones to tie the spaces together, so be sure to subscribe and stay connected. Let me know in the comments below if you’ve ever made an upholstered seat top or if you’re now planning on it. Thanks so much for checking out this post, there are some other posts below that you may also like!


Fabulous DIY No Sew Upholstered Bench Top
804 Sycamore - Amy

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Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub

Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub

Don’t you just love it when style and function come together!? I love a beautiful home that functions well for the family. When we built our home, we didn’t have much say on… well much. We didn’t want a bath tub, but that wasn’t an option. I suppose for resale, it will be a nice thing to have, but I don’t enjoy taking baths and wanted to use the space differently. However, I think I found a way to elevate bath time and create a spa-like experience with this easy shaker peg rail for the bathtub.


Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub

The bathtub surround is pretty plain, and a shelf wouldn’t work with how far the window sill sticks out compared to the space between the bathtub and the wall. So, the next best way to add character and function to this little space is with an easy shaker peg rail for the bathtub! I decided that this bathtub could be a nice place to shave my legs, and then I thought, this simple peg rail and some accessories would be a great project for dads and kids to treat their mom to a bathtub makeover and perhaps a quiet relaxing bath… without interruptions… or screaming… just saying.


Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub

For my easy shaker peg rail for the bathtub, I’m going to install the peg rail directly on top of the tile backsplash. If you don’t have backsplash or tall tile like I do, just consider installing the rail at a height that is easily accessible from a sitting position in the tub. For a reference point, my tile backsplash is 12 inches tall. The idea is to use some of the pegs for items and decor, but not to fill up every single one. Just like styling bookshelves, having negative space or blank space helps to highlight the used space. The shaker pegs are spaced 6″ apart and I cut the rail to go from wall to wall – this gives it a more original look instead of something hung on the wall after the fact. I love the built-in look and creating bits of architecture when I can.


Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub

I used a 1″x2″x6′ select pine board from Home Depot. I love the natural tone of the wood and the warmth it provides in my white and grey bathroom. After giving the board a light sanding, I sealed it with two coats of matte finish polyurethane. This will protect the wood in a humid environment. I also brushed a layer of polyurethane over the shaker pegs because the ones I purchased from Amazon are unfinished.


Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub

My oldest daughter, Sawyer, helped me film this easy shaker peg rail for the bathroom DIY video. I think it’s easiest to follow video, but just incase you like steps, here you go:

  • Measure the shaker peg rail space.
  • Mark the select pine board at this measurement and make a clean cut. (I used a mitre saw)
  • Give the select pine board a light sanding, including the corners and edges.
  • Seal the select pine board and shaker pegs with matte finish polyurethane. Two coats is adequate, allowing each coat to fully dry.
  • Find the studs on the shaker peg rail space and mark with pieces of painters tape.
  • Mark the spots for the shaker pegs – I like to cut a string the length of the board, fold it in half to find the exact center – mark it, then mark each peg six inches out.
  • Hold pine board up to wall and mark the board where the wall studs are located.
  • Predrill holes for shaker pegs – not too large. Predrill the wood screw holes for mounting (you can use a larger bit to make some space to counter-sink the screws).
  • Hand screw the shaker pegs in each spot.
  • Install the board to the wall – making sure it’s level and in the wall studs. I used 3″ construction screws.
  • Style the shaker peg rail and surrounding tub!

Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub – Video


Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub – Shop this post

I knew I wanted a shaker peg rail somewhere, but the kitchen and laundry rooms weren’t options for me. I’m so glad we have some wall space around the tub to add this decorative feature. I think it adds warmth, function, and a coziness that a shelf just couldn’t pull off. If you like the way I’ve styled my easy shaker peg rail for the bathtub, here are some of the exact items I used:

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thanks for considering my links!


Easy Shaker Peg Rail for the Bathtub

You can find shaker pegs all over, in stores and online, but the most common pegs require large holes to be drilled. I love the simplicity of these screw-in pegs because you don’t need a special tool to install them. This project can easily be done in an afternoon. You’ll need to account for a little time to acquire your shaker peg accessories, but this is an easy and quick DIY that can be done with the help of older kids too. I love that this peg rail can be used in any room to enhance the style of function of a space. A basement stairway, a drop zone or mud room, the laundry room, a powder room or bathroom, the kitchen, a utility closet, and even in a bedroom the peg rail can be a charming addition. I love my new easy shaker peg rail for the tub and I look forward to styling it in new ways in the future. Thanks so much for reading my blog, I hope you’ll subscribe and stay connected.

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Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone

Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone

The classic board and batten accent wall is my third DIY accent wall completed in this home, and it’s as simple as it looks. This easy DIY board and batten drop zone adds beauty and function to this strange little alcove off of our entryway. The alcove was framed in just in case we would have made the front office a bedroom – this would have been walled off and there would have been a door to access the bathroom from the bedroom. I wish we could have used the space differently, but we weren’t allowed to move walls during the build process.

Even so, I’m grateful for this little alcove because I’m going to make it functional and beautiful, very easily. This shot below shows the little space taped and protected with plastic so that I can spray primer and paint. The Emerald paint by Sherwin Williams is in Alabaster (like the walls and trim). I selected semi-gloss to coordinate with the existing trim and doors. Once the primer was up, it really started to shine and I could see my wall come to life. Spraying the two final coats of latex was so satisfying.


Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone

Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone
After measuring the middle of each panel and lining up the bottom of the hook, I marked the spots and then predrilled the holes for the modern brass hooks (set of 2 at Target).

So, I basically made lemonade with my lemons and used this little nook as a place for guests to hang coats and bags. It’s a great solution for this home because there isn’t a coat closet at all. The placement is pretty handy because then guests will also see where the restroom is. You can probably tell I’m quite pleased with this new accent wall / coat rack! The best part is that the board and batten continues into the powder room. I love the continuity and the simple detail it adds to the small space.

The steps are easy and it goes by quickly once you have your vertical board placement marked. I think the board and batten accent wall looks great at all heights, but keep in mind that a shorter version (4’ tall) will tend to look more country, while a floor to ceiling height will look more modern. I made our height 5’ plus the width of the baseboard and top trim boards, and this is a classic height that can go with many styles.


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Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone

Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone – Steps:

  1. Determine the desired height of your accent wall.
  2. Measure the wall and determine the distant between battens. I use graph paper to map out the wall. I like to use painter’s tape on the baseboard trim to mark my spots. My battens are spaced at slightly different widths on each wall because I wanted it to line up symmetrically and not just end off with wall. The width difference isn’t much and it’s not noticeable to the naked eye. I had to have a batten in the corner of this alcove and at the ends to cover the seam of the backer board.
  3. If your wall has texture, consider adding backer board to get the smooth finish of a classic board and batten wall.
  4. My walls were so small that I used solid pieces of backer board. However, if your wall is large, be sure to cut the backer board where the seams will be hidden behind a batten. I used liquid nails to attach the backer board and a brad nail gun (18 gauge nails) to secure the backer board into studs in a few spots.
  5. With the top and bottom boards measured, cut, and attached, I measured the length for each batten. They should all be the same since I used a level for the top board, but I like to measure just to be safe. I had to cut the top and bottom boards at a 45 degree angle to meet in the corner and create a professional finish.
  6. Hold up each batten to its marked spot, use a level to make it straight, and then draw a pencil line along one side to position it later. Next, I used liquid nails on each batten to attach the them to the backer board. Line each batten up with the pencil mark and then secure with a few brad nails.
  7. I used DAP patch and paint to cover my nail holes and the seams where wood meets. Once dry, sand with a 220 grit sponge or orbital sander. Vacuum, dust, and wipe the wall clean (tack cloth is great too).
  8. Use DAP interior caulk for the seams between the boards and backer board, as well as the top board and dry wall. You can’t sand caulk so make sure it’s smooth and even – if it’s not, just wipe it off and redo.
  9. With the caulk dry, you can tape and prep the area for priming and painting. I used Kilz 2 to prime, and two coats of semi-gloss Alabaster white by Sherwin Williams. Make sure each coat is completely dry before applying the next. I used a paint sprayer, the Graco TC Pro, and you can watch this video for my tips and tricks.
  10. I waited two days for the paint to dry and cure before installing my hooks. I prefer the look of a hook in the middle of each panel, but you can position them however you prefer.

Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone

Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone – Tools + Supplies:

Bottom and top trim boards (installed above the existing baseboard and along the top of the battens) – 3.25” wide

Select pine battens and top picture rail boards – 1 3/8” wide

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thanks for considering my links!


This next photo shows how I continued the board and batten wall into the powder room. This continuation gives me all the feels and it adds beauty to an otherwise boring wall in this tiny space. When you’re sitting on the toilette, this is your view~ I’m hoping to eventually add removeable wallpaper above the board and batten to add a little bit of pattern. When the left door (storage closet) and right door (entry door) are open, you can barely see the wall, but it’s the perfect space to add a little detail! I can’t wait to show you the rest of this powder room soon – it’s little, but so pretty.


Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone
You can see my pencil marks from attempting a different wall treatment. The Kilz 2 primer covered the pencil up no problem.

In hindsight, I wish I would have used a wider board for the top trim so that I would have had more clearance to use any type of hook I wanted. I do love these modern brass hooks, but they wouldn’t have been my first choice if I would have had more room for a different style hook.

You can also have fun painting your wall any color you want. I stuck with Sherwin Williams Alabaster to keep the monochromatic look with our walls. I actually sprayed these board and batten walls at the same time that I sprayed my herringbone accent wall. I had some time to kill while waiting for the correct paint spray tip to ship, so I got started on this easy DIY board and batten drop zone and had it ready to paint in no time. It’s really that easy!


Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone

Easy DIY Board and Batten Drop Zone

Don’t you just love the simple classic look of board and batten? The simple lines add so much to the architecture and style of the home – it’s simply stated, but impactful. I love board and batten as a focal wall, down a hallway, or even around an entire room. I also love how Kelly and Kristi of Lolly Jane created a double batten look in their dining room – such a beautiful twist on the classic design. And the next photo shows how Rachel, of Maison de Pax, adds elegance and function to her bathroom wall with board and batten and black iron wall hooks. I do love hooks in the bathroom – pretty and functional! Click on either photo to see the full tutorial on their blogs! These talented ladies are ones to follow~




There is plenty of board and batten wall inspiration on Pinterest and Instagram, but it really is the most simple accent wall you can create. The installation is straight forward and not difficult, and the impact is huge. I especially love it when board and batten is installed for a small entryway with hooks – it adds so much function and character! It’s a great project for beginners – you can even cut your boards with a handsaw if you don’t have a power saw (just sand the edges). You can also roll/brush your paint instead of spraying it (Magnolia Home paint goes on like butter). Let me know if you have any questions or comments below!

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Gorgeous herringbone board and batten accent wall

Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

If you follow me on Instagram, you know this stunning DIY herringbone board and batten accent wall has been a trial in patience and perseverance. I cannot tell you how good it feels to have it completely done and styled! I actually thought I’d have this wall done in about two weeks, tops! Without thinking about it too much, I’d say it’s been well over a month – and it feels longer than that. My journey should not deter you in installing your own herringbone accent wall because my learning curve will put you ahead of the game.



This stunning DIY herringbone board and batten accent wall wasn’t difficult to install, to do the finishing work, or to spray paint – but it was difficult running into unforeseen issues that just took time to work themselves out. This wall is a statement wall, it’s the first glimpse of our home’s vibe when guests walk in, and I’m so happy with the way it turned out!

There are a lot of herringbone board and batten tutorials out there, but I want to explain important aspects and steps that I took to complete my accent wall design. I think the details are so important and there are some things that you just don’t think about unless it’s brought to your attention. So, without further delay, I will show you a process pic and then share my tips for each step.


Video – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

Please hit the Like button in YouTube~

Tools + supplies – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

The primed MDF boards were purchased at a local wood supplier and were 18′ long by 3.25″ wide by 5/8″ thick. Be sure to give the boards a quick sanding because MDF can have little spots or corners of roughness that will show up after being painted. A part of planning out your wall is to also gather (or purchase) all the tools you’ll need – this will help you reduce possible delays.

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thanks for considering my links!


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

1. Plan out the wall – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

When you plan out your herringbone design, use painter’s tape to roughly measure where you want your vertical boards to go. Take into consideration any outlets, light switches, or in our case, a doorbell. Some people prefer an odd number of panels, but I wanted a very symmetrical look, so I went with four panels. I also wanted my diagonal boards to be at an average angle, not too low or high. Your personal preferences and logistics of the wall will help determine your vertical board placement. This is the time in the process that you’ll want to mark those wall studs with a pencil. I opted to not use chalk lines because I didn’t want the mess on the floor and the prime and paint will easily cover the pencil marks.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

2. Add borders – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

The first boards that I measured and cut were the outside vertical ones. The right end of this wall can be seen when walking toward the entry from the rest of the house so I didn’t want seams showing at the top and bottom boards. If this wall was incased by other walls, I would have done the top and bottom boards first. I made sure that the MDF boards weren’t bowed or rough for the right side since it is the finishing piece at that end. These boards were the easiest because they were installed into studs, the others were not.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

3. Add more borders – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

This photo shows the top and bottom boards installed as well as the center board. Some herringbone board and batten designs don’t use top and bottom boards, but I used them because I didn’t want to disturb the original baseboard or the double crown molding. The MDF boards are just a little thicker than the baseboards, but it doesn’t look funny and blends quite naturally.

It probably helps that the wall and molding are both Alabaster white by Sherwin Williams – the monochromatic look creates a consistency and fluid visual. However, there are other examples on Pinterest and YouTube of walls with the baseboard a different color than the herringbone wall and it looks great because the baseboard continues around the room while the herringbone wall is a standalone accent wall.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

4. Add the final vertical boards – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

Now the wall is taking shape and you can see the other two vertical boards are up and symmetrically spaced, creating my four panels. These vertical boards are installed with liquid nails and 18 gauge brad nails. I tried hard to make my cuts as close to perfect as possible, but honestly, I’m still getting to know my mitre saw. Whenever there was a little gap, I left it at the top so that the finishing work is less noticeable. After cutting each board, I placed it onto the wall, leveled it, and then used a pencil to draw along both sides of the board. This way, once I applied liquid nails to the board, I could easily find it’s place on the wall and know that it was straight and in position.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

5. First column – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

When it’s time to add your diagonal boards, make sure you have an odd number of boards, if possible. It’s easier to install and odd numbers are more aesthetically pleasing. Some blogs will just start at the bottom and make the rest of the boards evenly apart, but this often leaves a short board at the top as if the design is continuing. This is fine, but my personal preference was to create an accent wall – one piece – one full design.

So, I measured and cut the top and bottom boards first, then I sketched it out on paper to make sure three more boards between the top and bottom ones would look good – not too cramped or spread out. Five diagonal boards was perfect for my preference and I love the odd number. I also had to plan ahead for the second panel and locate where my diagonal boards would be. I cut these boards at 22.5 degrees and feel it’s a great angle for the width of my 40″ wide panels and for the entire size of the wall.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

6. Bottom row – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

With the first panel complete, I went ahead and measured and cut all the lower row boards. I did this because I wanted to see which direction (vertically or horizontally) I should continue and it turns out that I really got into a groove by installing boards for each panel vertically. Sometimes measuring is my nemesis, so I ended up having great success by cutting one angled cut, then lining it up to the board in the first panel using a T-square, and then just visually marking the other end of the board with a pencil. Sometimes I had to make a few cuts to shave a hair off or so, but this method worked better for me.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

7. Second column – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

I angled the diagonal boards downward because I thought it would be easier to cut around the outlet rather than the doorbell – and it was a good decision. When you plan out your wall in a rough sketch, consider the direction you prefer your diagonal boards go and then make sure it’s doable. I like either direction, but went with the easier cut.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

8. Third column – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

The last two columns went by pretty quickly, and at this point I noticed that some of my boards were pulling away from the wall. This can be caused by bowed MDF boards, but in my case it was mostly our wall. This was so frustrating at first because liquid nails wouldn’t work unless I held the board to the wall long enough to adhere (which wasn’t going to happen) or I had to figure out something else because brad nails would not work either.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

9. Fourth column – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

I didn’t use liquid nails on any of the diagonal boards because I was able to install each one into two, sometimes three, studs. I decided to keep installing my diagonal boards to see just how many boards would pull away from the wall, and then I’d deal with them all at once.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

10. Pulling boards – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

With all four panels done, I could see just how many boards were pulling away from the wall. There were 11 spots to deal with. But it was also so exciting to see it at this stage, taking shape, and looking amazing. My sweet hubs, Jeremy, did a bunch of research for me to solve the problem of the boards pulling away. We watched a video a few times and felt like this technique was the best option. So we ordered the treatment and had to wait for it to ship. I think there are comparable brands at Home Depot that do the same thing, but the video raved about this brand so we went with it.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

CA adhesive works on its own, but you have to clamp it or put pressure for a long period of time – which is no different than using liquid nails. However, you can also get the accelerator which causes the adhesive to dry almost instantly. To attach some of the diagonal boards, I carefully squirted some adhesive between the wall and board making sure that some squished out along the edge that was pulling away from the wall, then I had the accelerator ready to spray and hold it in place. After just a few seconds, I let go of the board and it stayed put. Success!!!

The only issues is that it’s very difficult to keep the amount of adhesive that gets squished out a minimal amount. I did too much on the first board and had to Dremel off some of the dry adhesive. But I got better with the other boards and my bead of caulk covered right over it. I sincerely hope that you don’t have the issue of boards pulling away, but if you do, this technique worked for me.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

11. Patch and caulk – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

The step to do all the finish work was completely intimidating for me. I had only caulked two seams on Sawyer’s shiplap wall and it was stressful because I had never done it and didn’t have a good feel for the caulking gun or the caulk. So, I was stressing over this beast of a wall with about 90 seams to caulk. I quickly and easily patched all the brad nail holes and seams where the boards met – I used DAP Patch-N-Paint with my finger because it was easier for me than using a spackle knife. Then I used DAP Alex Flex premium molding and trim caulk for paint projects for the wall/board seams.

When you prepare your caulk, you’ll need to carefully cut the tip off, at an angle, using a utility knife, and then used the poker built into the caulking gun to poke a hole through the seal by sticking it into the tip you just cut. Also make sure you know how to release the caulking gun so that when you need to stop caulking, you can release the pressure so it doesn’t keep coming out. Also have a protected surface ready to set the gun down in between running beads of caulk.

I used a cup of warm water and a paper towel ready to smooth each section caulked. Again, I was pretty stressed, but once you get into a groove of drawing beads of caulk (doesn’t have to be perfect, but try to keep it even) it’s easy to get into the groove of smoothing each bead with a wet finger. I would wet my finger, start smoothing it, and when it felt less smooth, I’d wipe excess caulk onto the paper towel and re-wet my finger to continue. It went so much faster than I expected and it was actually really satisfying. I caulked four seams at once, released the caulk gun pressure, and then smoothed the beads. This way the caulk didn’t have time to dry, but I could make sure the seam was continual within a space.

The DAP Paint-N-Patch is for nail holes and joints because it can be sanded. The DAP caulk is for where the boards meet the drywall and it cannot be sanded – if you mess up on a bead, just wipe it all off and redo it because you can’t fix it easily later (unless you’re just adding a little more caulk to a shallow area). Don’t skip the finish work step, it doesn’t look good to see seams and cracks.

Once everything is dry, you can sand it smooth. I used a Ridgid orbital sander with 220 grit paper and connected our shop-vac to it. Be careful at first to get a feel for the strength of the sander, but when you see how it’s smoothing your surface you will get a feel and it goes by faster.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

12. Prime and paint – Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall:

Once all the finish work is dry, looks good, is sanded smoothly, and then cleaned up (I used a Swiffer duster, a vacuum, and tack cloth), you can prep the area for priming and painting. Full disclosure, Jeremy wanted it sprayed, but I didn’t like the finish our cheap sprayer left and felt nervous about trying to use it again. So, again there was a delay in my momentum because I needed to research what the best route would be. After reading this post by Christine from Honey Built Home, I was convinced that I needed to spray this wall, use a high quality paint, and an airless paint sprayer that didn’t require adding any thinners.

We invested in the Graco TC Airless Pro Paint Sprayer. With any paint sprayer, there will be overspray, so I had to tape off everything, cover everything with plastic and protect myself with a hair covering, goggles, and an appropriate face mask respirator for the fumes. I also wore paper paint booties to cover my shoes. I also prepped a spot in our garage with a tarp and the supplies to add the primer and paint to the spray gun. I also had both batteries charged for the sprayer, and had a bucket ready in case I needed to unclog the sprayer (which I did). Whatever you do, be sure to read the manual of any sprayer and have it handy – it’s impossible to memorize after one or even two reads.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

In hindsight, I wish I would have just rolled on the primer because there was another delay waiting for the correct spray tip to ship and after it did arrive and I sprayed the primer, I realized that I had to clean the sprayer with mineral spirits. I don’t know about you, but I didn’t have mineral spirits laying around (now I do) so that was another quick trip to The Home Depot so that I could clean the sprayer before it started to dry inside my new spray tip! I wish I would have rolled on the primer while I waited for the tip to ship and not had to mess with cleaning oil-based primer.

I used Emerald paint by Sherwin Williams in Alabaster with a semi-gloss finish. The other issue I had is that when you clean the paint sprayer, you turn up the spray speed to 10. This is the highest speed and it’s great for cleaning. Once I had the sprayer clean and then full of latex paint, I forgot to move the speed setting down. This caused the paint to run in several spots before I realized what was happening. I moved the speed down to 4 (which also uses less paint) and it sprayed perfectly.

I had to wait for the runs to dry, and once dry, I used a razor blade to cut the thickness off, sanded it using a 120 grit sponge and then a 220 grit sponge (what I had on hand). There were a few spots that I had to used the DAP Patch-N-Paint to smooth out, then sand, before spraying the final coat. It was a process, and I’m glad I learned so much, but my spray speed mistake was frustrating. One final note about spraying – be sure to keep your paint can inside the house. I think keeping the can in the garage between the first and second coats (over 2 days) thickened it up and I had to unclog the sprayer several times in the beginning of spraying the final coat.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

This beautiful C.S. Lewis wall art is from an awesome Etsy shop called Rooted and Grounded Home. My order was shipped quickly and I’m so happy with the quality and craftsmanship of my new wall art. If you love supporting small business and handmade shops, this company is one to check out.


Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

Stunning DIY Herringbone Board and Batten Accent Wall

Shop this space:

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thanks for considering my links!


I just love the final look, styled with a natural worn wood console and some spring vibes. Confession… I have already moved some things and switched this area up a bit. I just love it so much and enjoy seeing different pieces on it. Be sure to follow me on Instagram so you can see how this space changes each season (or whenever I get the itch for a change!). Thanks so much for checking out my stunning DIY herringbone board and batten accent wall. I think this wall seems like it could be complicated with the angled cuts and overall design, but with a little planning, you can create your own beautiful accent wall to fit your style. Would you want a herringbone accent wall in your home, and if yes, in what space? Let me know in the comments below~


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How to add a light fixture anywhere

How to add a light fixture anywhere

Do you have places in your home; nooks, corners, crannies that could use a little extra light? But maybe you don’t have a table for a lamp, you don’t want a floor lamp there, or there’s not an outlet to plug something in – this awesome DIY shows you how to add a light fixture anywhere you want. I love this light hack, and I’m going to have to slow my roll with it because I find myself looking at all the areas around the house to see if I want a new ‘anywhere’ light here or there. If you don’t want to commit to hardwiring a light, if hiring an electrician is not in the budget, or if you don’t want a cord running down your wall – then you’re going to love this idea of how to add a light fixture anywhere! Seriously, anywhere!


How to add a light fixture anywhere

So, once you find the place you want to add a light fixture (and when I say light fixture, I’m primarily referring to hardwired wall sconce fixtures), you’ll want to measure the space if there’s not much wall (like above my built-in) – make sure your sconce base will fit the wall. If you’re adding a sconce to a wide open wall, you’re free to pick the style you love without worry of the base size. Also keep in mind that the puck light will not provide super bright task lighting – they’re more for mood lighting or brightening up a space enough to do what you do (like a closet). I think of them as accent lights, it’s dim lighting to add warmth or a touch of light to an area you want to highlight a bit. Another consideration is the size of the sconce shade. You’ll need to make sure the puck light will fit into the shade either by a wire or Velcro.


How to add a light fixture anywhere

There are some obvious benefits to adding an ‘anywhere’ light to your home, but my favorite bonus is that it allows you to live with a new wall sconce in a location for a while before you commit to having it actually hardwired permanently. I love to switch things around and redesign spaces, so with these ‘anywhere’ lights, I can just remove some screws and patch the holes – just like I do for wall art or shelves. And if you do love your new wall sconce and want to have it hardwired, you’ve already done the work of mounting the fixture!


How to add a light fixture anywhere – DIY video

My oldest daughter, Sawyer, helped me film some of this video and she just did a great job! I’ve captured all my steps here in hopes that you’re encouraged when you see just how easy it is. I’d love it if you hit the Like button, thanks so much for checking it out!


How to add a light fixture anywhere – steps

Here are the steps on how to add a light fixture anywhere:

  1. Make sure the fixture will fit within your space
  2. Make sure the puck light will fit within the shade
  3. Make sure the puck light has fresh batteries and works
  4. Add one side of Velcro to the shade, making sure the other Velcro half will touch at least the corners of it
  5. Add the other side of Velcro to the puck light
  6. Stick the puck light inside the shade and press down so that the Velcro grabs hold
  7. Read mounting instructions for the fixture – it’s standard to mount a bracket to the wall, and then attach the fixture
  8. Once the fixture is attached, add the shade

How to add a light fixture anywhere

You can use Velcro to hold in the puck light – this makes it easy to remove when you need to swap out batteries. Some fixtures have holes inside that you can guide wire into and then also into the puck light for a very secure hold, but this could add a hassle when you need to swap the batteries (you’ll need to twist and pull the puck light to replace batteries) – each fixture varies. If you decide to make your wall sconce permanent, you can easily remove the Velcro strip – it’s a great temporary but secure way to hold the puck light. Puck lights also come with a remote and one remote controls them all within a certain range. You can also dim the lights or set them on a timer so that you don’t have to walk around turning them all off.

Here are some of my favorite wall sconces. I’m not sure if the puck light will fit, but they visually look just right (be sure to read the dimensions before purchasing).

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Thank you for considering and using my links!


How to add a light fixture anywhere


How to add a light fixture anywhere

How to add a light fixture anywhere

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IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

The original plan for Sawyer’s IKEA Billy Bookcase was very different than how it turned out. I would say that around half of my ideas change shape from the original idea – that’s a part of design and planning, sometimes plans change. In my mind, the bookcase would have no glass, and cane webbing in place of the glass. Then when I actually purchased the IKEA bookcase, I realized that the glass was incased in between the wood doors. And I wasn’t going to break out the glass so it was staying put. After unboxing the door, I realized I only had about 1/18 inch of wood to staple the cane webbing into the wood… um what?! The cane bookcase idea wasn’t going to work. As usual, I went to the Internet to brainstorm other possibilities for the IKEA Billy Bookcase boho hack. Jen of City Farmhouse actually paints right over the glass – her bookcase unit turned out beautifully, check it out here. I considered decoupaging paper and fabric, stapling fabric, contact paper, and peel and stick wall paper. I ordered some free contact paper samples and knew right away that paper wasn’t going to get us the boho look. We needed texture! Sawyer has had a burlap pin board for several years and she wanted to keep it with her new room design, so we decided to try out some burlap fabric in the bookcase.


IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack – Tutorial

The steps are easy and straight forward. In fact, there are probably many other ways to attach fabric to cabinet doors, but this is how I did it. You can also check out my short video to see how easy it is, but here are the steps:

  1. Measure the cabinet door and determine how much fabric or burlap you need to buy.
    (I only needed three yards for this 8′ bookcase because the burlap is 45″ wide.)
  2. Cut the burlap in half and iron out any creases.
  3. Apply double sided tape around the inside of the bookcase, right against the edge of the wood frame near the glass.
    (The tape is just to reinforce the edge of the burlap and help keep it in place. It may not be necessary at all.)
  4. Use a small nail and lightly hammer the nail into each corner of the wood to make a start for the thumbtack.
  5. Then carefully hammer a flat thumbtack into the shallow nail hole until it’s flush with the wood.
    (I evenly placed 10 thumbtacks around each cabinet door.)
  6. Add door hinges and attach doors and handles to the cabinet.

IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack – Video

Be sure to watch the entire video from start to finish. It’s short and the end shows how I organized the inside of the bookcase, shelf by shelf! Also, please hit that Like button!


IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack – Shop this space

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IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

IKEA Billy Bookcase Boho Hack

Full disclaimer: It’s not perfect. There, I said it! I didn’t cut the burlap perfectly straight, I didn’t cut the burlap correctly (just google it), and I didn’t finish the burlap edge with a stitched edge or glue – nothing. But it still looks good, it works well, and it really does look cool in-person. This bookcase is a place for my daughter’s stuff and even though it’s organized stuff, it’s not stuff that she wants to look at all the time. So, covering the glass doors with inexpensive burlap was our fix. I love the idea of painting these doors, but that style wasn’t as good as a fit for this room. We could have found a different cabinet for her things, but we wanted a tall and slim bookcase to do the job – and the IKEA price couldn’t be beat. The point is, this worked for us and I hope it inspires ideas to help make your furniture or design work for you. Design plans don’t always pan out, so be encouraged that you’ll find a solution that works well and looks good too! And I’m always happy to help brainstorm possible ideas, so leave me a comment or shoot me an email!

If you don’t want clear glass doors on your cabinet or bookcase, there are lots of different techniques to consider. Using burlap is just one idea to consider and it was really easy to install and it’s not permanent. If we remove the burlap, tacks, and tape, there will be 10 tiny tack holes left, but we’re not worried about those. If you like this side of my teen daughter’s room, you gotta check out the other side with her bed. I created boho farmhouse shiplap with a plant shelf – it’s relaxing and soothing~


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How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap
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How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

The farmhouse style has been taking shape ever since Joanna Gaines made us all so aware of its simple beauty. There are many interpretations of the farmhouse style, I tend to lean toward the modern farmhouse look. However, lately I’ve been infusing some boho throughout our house. I love the textures and natural elements found in the bohemian look. The boho style can also be super colorful or simply neutral, it’s so flexible and fun! In designing a look for my teenage daughter’s bedroom, it was definitely going to be boho, but I wanted it to flow with our home too. I’m so excited to show you how to create boho farmhouse shiplap and give you a mini tour of her bedroom design.


How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap – Shop this space

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Before construction!


My daughter, Sawyer, knows what she likes, but she’s also very open and flexible when considering other opinions and options. I had so much fun designing her bedroom space together. We threw around different ideas, color schemes, and how she wanted the room to feel. She likes color, but wanted the room to feel calm and relaxed, so we went with muted tones. The original feature wall was going to be diagonal board and batten, but it would have been too difficult for me to match up the boards with the french cleat bracket for her cane headboard – I just wasn’t up to that DIY challenge yet. She likes shiplap, but didn’t want white. We agreed to a light grey green, and found the most beautiful shade in Magnolia Home paint, called Clean Lines and it’s the best paint I’ve every used. I hate painting, I mean I seriously don’t like anything about it except picking out colors. I went ahead and brushed a coat onto the gap of the shiplap because it seemed like it would be difficult to paint inside it once it was installed. Magnolia Home paint went on like butter, hardly had an odor to it, and I painted all 9 boards in less than 30 minutes. Yeah, I went ahead and rolled the first coat on the entire board after feeling how fast and easy the layer went onto the gap. It dried quickly also and the finish was smooth and luxurious. I love it and have already started scoping out Magnolia Home colors for my husband’s office. I used about a half gallon after applying the second coat to the half-wall of shiplap. I’m guessing a can would have given me two coats of the entire 10’x12′ wall.


How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap – Video Tutorial

I did my fair share of shiplap research, and found that I had to look for several tutorials in order to figure out how to do all the necessary steps for my wall. For the side baseboard issue, Jeremy and I had to just brainstorm and determine what we wanted to do. And I figured out the hard way that I would need to trim off the shiplap gap along the very top board if I wanted my shelf to work out. I created a video that covers all the details I came across when installing my shiplap, but I’ll also list them out below. I hope you find all the details you need and don’t have to shop around to cover unforeseen issues. Please hit that Like button on my video~



At this point, I ran out of daylight and realized that I attached my last shiplap board. I didn’t want to take it down to remove the shiplap gap along the top for the shelf, so I ran over to The Home Depot and got another board. This mistake turned out for the best because it made the wall a better height for the cane headboard. Lucky mistake for me!


How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap
At this point, I thought I was done with attaching the shiplap… but there was a problem with my top board. Be sure to watch my video to know how to prepare your last board for the shelf install.

How to Create Boho Shiplap – Step by Step

  1. Remove the baseboard trim and outlet covers.
  2. Cut the side intersecting baseboards at a 90 degree angle using a multi-tool.
  3. Mart the studs on your wall or use a stud finder for each board (I had to do this a bit because the huge electrical box in the wall threw off the stud finder).
  4. Paint the shiplap gaps – or the entire boards. This is a good time to paint the outlet covers if you want a seamless look.
  5. For each board, cut off a small piece to make sure each end is cut square.
  6. For each board, measure the wall, mark the cut on the board near the other end that hasn’t already been trimmed. It’s better to have the board be too long and have to go back and shave off a little more. Having the boards fit as closely as possible will make your caulking step later a bit easier.
  7. Place the shiplap board in place on the wall, use a level in case your floor isn’t level, and then use a brad nail gun to secure it into each stud. Use two inch brad nails and place two nails into each stud.
  8. Repeat steps 5, 6, 7 for each board – except the very top board.
  9. Once all the boards are up, add plastic wood to the brad nail holes. Once dry, sand smooth. I like to vacuum the dust and wipe it with a microfiber cloth.

    Cutting around an outlet
  10. When you reach an outlet, you’ll need to use a jigsaw or multi-tool to cut the piece out of the shiplap board. It helps to use one of the trimmed off ends to help you mark on the trim piece where the electrical box is located. I show how to do this step in the video. Please hit that Like button if you watch.
  11. Before you attach the shiplap boards around the outlet, you’ll need to CUT the POWER and add a gang box extender. This will pop out your outlet so that it’s flush with your new shiplap wall. You much CUT the POWER in order to unscrew the outlet and shimmy the extender box onto the outlet box. You screw the gang box extender in place and then add your boards. Once in place and lined up, tighten your outlet screws and you can resume power.

    Install Boho plant shelf
  12. To add a simple plant shelf, you’ll need to trim off the gap from the top piece of shiplap. I used a circular saw to do this, but a table saw would also work well.
  13. Our wall was just short of 12 feet long, so I used two 1″x2″x6′ select pine boards and two 1″x4″x6′ select pine boards.
  14. Measure the wall, and cut all 4 boards to fit perfectly across.
  15. Place the 1″x2″ boards on the wall – I used painters tape to hold mine up. Mark the stud locations along the bottom of the boards. I measured up 1/4″ inch for each stud mark because this is where you predrill your screw holes. Make sure you face out the prettiest side to mark your screw holes because this side will be seen. They are at 1/4″ up from the bottom because they’ll be hidden by the 1″x4″ shelf board later.
  16. You can attach the 1″x2″ boards to the wall into the studs. Make sure the boards are flush with the top shiplap board and even with each other as well. I used 3″ wood screws to attach this board to the wall.
  17. Hold your 1″x4″ boards up to the 1″x2″ board and mark three places to add your pocket holes. They can’t be aligned with the screws into the studs, that’s why your holding it up to the 1″x2″ boards so see where those screws are located.
  18. Use the Kreg pocket jig tool to make your pocket holes. These are placed on the underside of your shelf board, make sure you pick the prettiest side of this board to be on top.
  19. You may need a helper to hold up the shelf while you attach 1.25″ screws into the pocket holes. You can leave the pocket holes exposed, or fill with plastic wood, and sand when dry. You can also add plastic wood to the middle shelf seam if you don’t like seeing the line.
  20. You can caulk the seems along the side walls if you want. I chose to do this because my cuts weren’t perfect and the caulk helped to line things up.
  21. Once dry, prep your space for the final coat of paint.
  22. Once the paint is full dry, attach your outlet cover and style~

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

My Tools to Create this Boho Farmhouse Shiplap:

This site contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links at no extra cost to you. Thank you for your consideration in using my links!


How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

How to Create Boho Farmhouse Shiplap

Magnolia Home Paint, Clean Lines color is so pretty and definitely one to see in-person for the true color. It looks great in this space and works well in our home. The beauty of boho farmhouse is that it’s so flexible, almost any color would work for this project. I hope this tutorial is helpful and inspirational. It was my first go with shiplap and it was challenging and fun. Now, I feel even more confident to take on other projects. Let me know what you think in the comments below and be sure to subscribe to get an update on the other side of this Boho Farmhouse bedroom, and more DIY and decorating!


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How to Hack Boho Kitchen Island Lights

How to Hack Boho Kitchen Island Lights

These boho kitchen island lights are my favorite DIY! These three darling lights took only 15 minutes to make and attach! And the price at $10 each makes it my kind of hack. It all started when we selected our lighting package for our home. I had five packages to choose from and I picked the best out of five packages I didn’t care for. We always knew we’d work on changing out lighting fixtures as our budget allowed, but the existing island lights drove us all nuts. My teenager called them plate lights – it’s pretty accurate too. The kitchen island lights would need to be the first to go, thus began the search for their replacements. And after searching the Internet for brass kitchen island lights and realizing that none of them were in the budget I started brainstorming a temporary solution. I had also been admiring all the basket light shades, they’re gorgeous and add so much warmth and texture to a kitchen with its hard surfaces and appliances. I’m so excited to show you how to hack boho kitchen island lights with these Threshold baskets for only $10 each. They are 12″ in diameter and super easy to transform into a shade – I even love the natural shade shape of these beauties. So, until I can get my brass pendant lights, we will enjoy and love our new boho basket lights!



Before I get to it, have you seen the prices on basket (rattan, bamboo, wicker, etc.) light shades? They’re pretty steep considering they’re just baskets. I’m sure the gorgeous boho style has increased their demand, but I had to try a more affordable approach. This hack is pretty straight forward, but I’ll list out the steps and you can watch the super short video too. Just be sure to be careful when using a utility knife or any cutting tool. And my existing kitchen island pendant lights were perfect for adding a new shade to, but I realize this won’t be the case for everyone. Before I even went on the hunt for baskets, I made sure I could easily disassemble the pendant light and understand how it was put together. I quickly realized how easy it would be to add a thin basket to my crazy plate lights.


How to hack boho kitchen island lights

  1. Carefully cut of the Threshold basket handles.
  2. Flip basket upside down and line up the base socket to the middle of the bottom.
  3. Use a sharpie to trace a line around the base socket.
  4. Carefully use a utility knife to cut along the sharpie mark.
  5. Add the basket to the light fixture and secure by screwing on the base socket.
  6. Then add your light bulb.

This site contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links at no extra cost to you. Thank you for your consideration in using my links!


Threshold basket
This site contains affiliate links to products. We may receive a commission for purchases made through these links at no extra cost to you. Thank you for your consideration in using my links!



Well, that’s pretty much it – super easy and really affordable. I just love the way these look in-person. I was a little worried that my husband wouldn’t appreciate the look, but he thinks they look awesome – and that says a lot! I hope this post encourages you to think of alternative ways to create the look you love for less, and to have some fun doing it. Be sure to subscribe to receive my decorating and DIY inspiration.


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