DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

My husband and I have walked through Restoration Hardware a dozen times, admiring their designs and styling, and never once buying a thing. This changed when one of their kitchen pendant lights were very reasonably priced, and the quality was a standout compared to the others we were looking at. I’m not sure I’ll ever own a home worthy of their grand designs, or that my budget will ever allow it, but I love the style and inspiration this brand provides me. I have been looking for a piece of furniture to live across from the formal dining room. It’s a little nook and walkway so it’s been tricky. I finally came up with a solution, a DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart!

The journey to finally just build this piece has been long and winding. I first saw an amazing vintage bakers rack at 417 Vintage Market in Branson Missouri. Then I found a large rolling cart for gardening supplies at The Junk Ranch show in Prairie Grove Arkansas. Both were out of budget and I’m not sure they would have fit in my SUV anyway. It only recently occurred to me that I could and should build something when I stumbled upon Ana White’s rolling shelf build. With so much amazing inspiration, it was time to sketch out and plan my DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart. Here’s the original that inspired it all:


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

There are many other similar versions of this rolling cart for sell, but when you DIY, you can customize the exact size, color, and style you want (plus save a lot of $$). When we first moved into this house, I placed a tall bookcase in this space across from the dining room, the bookcase also used to be in the dining room of our previous home. So, I already knew what a tall bookcase looked like in this space, and it didn’t allow for much to go above it. I wanted a rolling cart that was tall enough to be useful, but not too tall that I couldn’t use the wall space above it. So, I built my DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart long, and not as tall. Here are the exact dimensions of my design: 6′ wide, 50″ tall, 14″ deep. Adding two-inch nonskid wheels brings the total height to 52″. This design can be created to fit any space you want. I used 2×8 boards as the center board of my shelves because I had them on hand. However, if you need deeper or more shallow shelves, you can create whatever size shelves you need.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart
Here’s a pic of our custom-built home in Oregon. That bookcase has been all around and is currently upstairs in our bonus room holding craft bins.

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

You may have noticed that my support rods across the back of each shelf are wood dowels. After pricing out various pipe, I decided wood dowels were much more my speed and I already had the drill bit to create the one-inch diameter hole that I needed. I stained the dowels with the cart, and I love how it looks less industrial and a little more vintage. However, you could use PVC pipe and paint it, or if it’s your style and in your budget, copper piping would also be stunning. So many possibilities – all customizable.


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DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

I created a video (below) to show the process of building this DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart, but I will list the basic steps here as well:

  1. Determine your dimensions and list out your shelf lengths. The top shelf is the longest because it sets on top of the vertical corner support boards. The inside shelves will be a total of three inches shorter because they fit inside the vertical corner support boards. And the bottom shelf has the inside 2×8 board the same length as the top shelf, but the outside 2×4 shelf boards are shorter like the inside shelves. Ana White created the image above to show her dimensions, but I want you to notice the lengths of boards for each shelf. Design your DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart and create a cut list for your pieces. Here is a link to my cut list.
  2. Assemble the shelves. I drilled pocket holes in the 2×4 boards and then attached them to each side 0f the 2×8. This construction created my 14″ deep shelves. Drill 1.5″ pocket holes and use 2.5″ pocket hole screws. I plugged the pocket holes on the top shelf because I thought the underside may be seen. You can plug all the holes, none, or the top shelves – your preference.
  3. Add the four vertical support boards. I also drilled pocket holes at the corners of the inside shelves. I added the four 2×4 corners to the bottom shelf first, then I added the top shelf, and lastly installed the in between shelves. For the top and bottom shelves I used 3″ self-drilling wood screws instead of pocket holes, but be sure to predrill holes to prevent the wood from splitting.
  4. I turned my assembled rolling cart onto one side and drilled my one-inch holes for the back support dowels. Be sure to measure carefully. I centered the hole on the 2×4 and then measured up 6″ inches from the shelf. I didn’t want my back support to be perfectly centered, so I adjusted it down a bit to look right to me. Add the wooden dowels by twisting and pushing. I centered the wooden dowel so that a little was hanging out on each side. Then I used a multitool to cut the end flush.
  5. Now it’s time to sand. I sanded down all the surfaces using 80 grit paper on my orbital sander. Then I finished with 220 grit. I usually do at least three grits, sometimes four on more finished pieces, but some of the boards had a reddish tint and the whole piece was more rustic and vintage so I wasn’t concerned about a perfectly finished look. I also hoped the white wash technique would even out the different colored boards.
  6. Dust and wipe after sanding and then add a preconditioner to the wood. This quick step also allows the wood to evenly absorb the stain. It dried quickly, but wait at least 30 min. before applying your first coat of stain.
  7. Be sure to follow the instructions on your stain. I used Rove & Dwell’s farmhouse interior stain. I use a staining sponge to evenly apply the beautiful color. Once dry, I used a 220 grit sanding sponge to smooth things out. Dust and wipe, and then apply the white wash stain. The particular white wash stain I used said to not sand between coats of white wash. I applied two coats of the white wash stain. Brush it on, let it sit for 3 minutes and then I used a staining sponge to wipe up the excess. You can add extra protection by adding a layer of matte finish polyurethane.
  8. Once dry, add the non-marking casters and any other decorative brackets you want. I did not use the screws that came with the corner brackets because they wouldn’t have worked with all my pocket hole screws. Instead, I used upholstery brass nails and they look and worked perfectly. The bracket is purely decorative, so two nails hold it just fine.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

Full disclosure: My rolling cart has a little wobble. However, once I added some decor it helped. The most frustrating part of this design is that all the wood isn’t perfectly straight and square. This is especially true when using the cheapest common 2×4 boards I could find. Even if you check for bowed boards at the store, it’s just impossible to get every board perfectly straight. I’m sure there are tricks to correcting this, but in my beginner status, I’m still learning. And even with the imperfections I’m very happy with the way this DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart turned out. It looks better than I pictured and styling it is going to be so much fun. There aren’t a lot of places this new piece can fit in this home, but I’m so excited to enjoy it until I build my dream piece for this spot. Be sure to subscribe to my blog to get decorating and DIY inspiration and tutorials – including this dream piece of furniture I will make in the future.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart
Here’s a quick photo of the dining room – the space that faces this little nook.

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

Well, that’s it – our new little rolling cart is done and I’m so glad I made a piece of furniture for this spot. Thank you so much for checking out this post. I hope it was helpful and inspiring. This last photo is how the cart is styled as I write this post. I’m sure it will be changing again soon, but with every little tweak I like it even more. Be sure to follow me on Instagram where I post more decorating photos and videos. Take care and be safe while building your DIY dreams.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

boho farmhouse bathroom wall treatment

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Our girls share a bathroom. Fortunately, they are eight years apart and have done well sharing the small space. Our sophomore in high school doesn’t spend a bunch of time primping, and our seven-year-old prefers my shower over her bath. When we built the home, our teenager selected the shower and floor tile. We all loved the way it turned out and it was a nice neutral modern farmhouse style which has made it easy to decorate later on. With the bath tile going all the way up to the ceiling, there are only two walls to really decorate. I selected the wall behind the door to install the boho farmhouse bathroom wall treatment to. The bathroom is narrow, so we won’t hang any wall art over the treatment, but the treatment alone provides enough style and interest without additional art.


Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Coming up with the bathroom wall treatment was easy. I wanted horizontal board and batten, floor to ceiling, but I wanted to add more detail and interest. So, I found the perfect trim pieces to add a nice curve and some shape to the 1″x5″ boards. Selecting a paint color was another story. But to install this wall treatment, I measured twice, cut twice, and took my time with the finish work. The wall didn’t have texture on it to begin with, but the drywall and painter guys didn’t worry about over spraying bits of the texture or making little dings in the wall. Luckily, these imperfections didn’t cause any issues, and the wall turned out beautifully. You can do this wall treatment over a textured wall, or you can create a flat surface by skimming it or adding backer board. It’s all about personal preference and your long-term plans for the wall.


Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

The biggest challenge with installing this wall treatment was accounting for the shower wall tile that was installed at an angle. You guys, this challenge was not fun, and I didn’t even notice it until later on. I would definitely recommend recruiting help to hold up and level long boards. I would have identified the angled tile edge much sooner if I would have asked for help. So, when it comes to holding up long heavy boards that you want level, just call for help. Other than that, this bathroom wall treatment was easy and even fun to create. I had to make sure the spacing between the horizontal boards worked out around the door trim (I like to avoid complicated cuts), but other than that it’s very straight forward.


Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

  • First, clean and clear the wall.
  • Then measure the length of the wall and determine how many boards you’ll need and what length of boards. We have ten-foot ceilings and I placed 14″ between each board.
  • I used liquid nails and a brad nail gun with 18-gauge nails.
  • I left the existing baseboard in place and just painted it the same color as the wall treatment for a monochromatic modern farmhouse look.
  • Once all the horizontal boards are evenly placed and installed, I added the curved trim piece to the top and bottom of each board.
  • Patch all the nail holes, allow to fully dry, and then sand smooth. Clean all the dust.
  • Add caulking between the curved trim pieces and the board, and the curved trim pieces and the wall. I also caulked the ends and sealed up any cracks or lines to create a finished seamless look.
  • Once the caulk was dry, I taped off all around the wall treatment. For the right side where the treatment meets the white trim and wall, I first painted along the tapeline with the existing SW Alabaster white paint. This way, the green paint wouldn’t bleed into the little textured bumps. You can either do this method or touch up later – either way, you’ll get a nice defining line between where the two colors meet.
  • Then I painted on the Fresh Idea green color. I used a two-inch brush to paint the curved trim and along the sides. Then I rolled on the rest. The primed wall took two coats of SW Fresh Idea, and the eggshell finish looks smooth but is wipeable in this bathroom space.

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Selecting paint colors is so fun, I love the process of determining the mood of the space, making sure the color flows with the rest of the home, and selecting something that imparts a certain feeling in the space as well. For a bathroom, I prefer calming and soothing tones. I see the value of energetic colors or just picking your favorite color too. The paint color would need to coordinate with our cabinetry color (SW Repose Gray) and it would need to be timeless over trendy because I do not like to paint and I’d rather not repaint this wall ever or for a long while. So, since my teenager, Sawyer, did such a great job with the tile selections, I asked her what color she preferred and she said green. So I found several green tones that I found acceptable and then asked both girls to pick their top two favorites. Luckily, they both picked the same one for one of their choices. The paint color is Fresh Idea by Sherwin Williams and it’s a beautiful medium/light green with a slight blue grey undertone. I would describe it as a muddy green blue. It dries darker than it goes on and matched the swatch perfectly so we were all really happy with the final results.


Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment
See the top of the doorway trim? This helped me determine my spacing between the horizontal battens.

This medium green tone may be a little dark in a room without windows for some, but with the dark wall tile, it sort of brightened things up and added a nice contrast. Green is a neutral tone but it adds so much to this once totally neutral space. With a colorful runner rug and a few plants, this space turned out beautiful. I also opted to use the decorative shelving above the toilette to hold Sawyer’s bits and bobs. This way, she doesn’t have to clutter up the counter because the shelf is easily accessible and everything is right at her fingertips. For some reason, putting things back in drawers is much more of a chore~ So, while the wall shelf is a bit cluttered for my taste, it makes her morning routine easier.


Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

I added the shower curtain, laundry basket, and runner rug to this space, and it instantly gave it a bit of a boho farmhouse vibe. The space is fresh and fun for my sweet girls and it’s so nice to add some color to this neutral space. If you see something you like, you can shop this space below. This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!



Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment: Video


Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment
This little laundry hamper adds great boho vibes and helps the girls get their wet towels off the floor~

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Boho Farmhouse Bathroom Wall Treatment

Thank you so much for checking out this boho farmhouse bathroom wall treatment! It was an easy treatment to install, and the curved trim gives it an elevated look to the traditional board and batten style. I hope you are inspired to look at your bathroom or any wall for an opportunity to add a wall treatment. Fair warning, once you start adding beautiful wall treatments to your home, adding charm, you may find it difficult to stop. There are so many possibilities, and a wall treatment works so well with the farmhouse look – they’re all so beautiful. If you have any questions, please let me know. You can contact me on the blog, on Instagram, YouTube, or even Pinterest. Best wishes on your next DIY!

804 Sycamore - Amy
How to Convert a Can Light

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

Our home is a little over a year old, but there are so many things I want to do to it. The builder gave us a handful of lighting packages to choose from. This means I got to pick my favorite out of packages that I didn’t really like too much. We couldn’t modify anything, bring in our own lights, and for the first year of homeownership, we had to use their electrician for any work we wanted done. I was anxiously waiting for the one-year warranty to be up so that I could make some changes. One of the changes that I waited to do was the lighting in our primary bathroom. The vanity lights will be different someday, but for now, I learned how to convert a can light to a pendant light and these pendants add so much character. The brass accents on the pendants also visual warmth to the space and the bulbs create a nice mood lighting too.

This post will not explain the technical steps I took to convert a can light to a pendant light (liability and stuff). But I will tell you what I used and share my tips. If electrical work scares you or you are hesitant to DIY a lighting project, be sure to contact an electrician. It’s not worth the risk. When I tackled this DIY lighting conversion, I triple checked to make sure the electricity was off, I reread the instructions multiple times (to make sure I understood and because they weren’t very well written~). I felt comfortable attempting this project and had my husband double check my work. Doing electrical work, yourself can lead to house fires and even electrocution, be careful and consider your risks before attempting any home DIY.


How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

After I selected the pendant lights that would replace the two can lights, I made note of the diameter of the base. I needed to know if the new pendant base would cover the hole in the ceiling left by the can light. Unless you’re replacing a can light with a large flush mount light, it’s fairly likely that you’ll need a goof ring to go between the new light and the ceiling. These can be painted to match your ceiling and I barely notice ours. However, this look isn’t for everyone in which case you’ll need a drywall dude to come and make some repairs which will cost more than the goof ring, but it may be worth it to you. You will also want to take note of what bulb wattage the new lighting takes. If you need bright light, make sure your fixtures can take high wattage bulbs.

I purchased a two pack of converters because I had two can lights to convert and it was cheaper, but you can get just one or larger packs too. I unboxed the kit and studied the directions and got a good understanding of what I’d be doing with all the parts and the order to do them in. I read the instructions so many times my eyes felt like crossing, but it’s better to be confident than confused. So, once you have the new light fixture, the goof ring, and the converter kit, you’re ready to make the change.

In addition to double checking to see if the electricity was on, I used a non contact voltage detector. It’s better to be safe than sorry and it gave me peace of mind to know I made the checks before touching electrical wires. I created a video (below) showing how to convert a can light to a pendant light, but it’s mainly to show the process and steps. Everyone’s home has a positive and a negative electrical wire for the lighting but depending on the age of your home and building codes, wire colors may differ from mine and construction is sometimes just strange. If you watch the video, don’t use it as a tutorial, but as a general guide to show you the basic steps taken and how easy it is to convert your lighting.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

Here are the items I used to convert a can light to a pendant light:

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. As an Amazon Associate, I may also earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!



How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

I found a site that offers custom goof rings. You can determine the inner and outer diameter so that you can cover any sized hole once the can light is removed. Some goof rings can be painted or found in other finishes like bronze, brass, black, etc. With the addition of pendant lights in our primary bathroom, my next project is updating the vanity lights, mirrors, and adding a decorative touch. Step by step our bathroom is coming together. Here are some progress shots of the space but be sure to subscribe to get updates when more is completed.



How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
I removed my wall pegs behind the tub because this vintage door made into a shelf was a perfect fit and gives the space pretty vintage vibes. Plus, I added glass knobs to give me those functional pegs back~

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
If you have seen Escape to the Chateau on Netflix, then you will notice that I hung a Union Jack flag just like Angel did above their tub. I love the look and it adds a touch of character and color above the privacy Roman shade.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
One of the things I love about these pendant lights is how pretty they look when they’re off. You will see their pretty glow in the YouTube video, but during the daytime they’re also so lovely.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
Here’s a close-up of my vintage door shelf. I love the natural chippy paint and repurposed piece in here. It gives me a shelf and knobs to hang bath time essentials.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
Do you have a clock in your bathroom? I have this little brass clock from Target in each bathroom because it seems like time just flies when in this room – especially for my teenaged daughter! Maybe in retirement I’ll look at the clock less, but for now it seems my day is ruled by it.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
I just love abstract landscapes, the older the better. The bottom frame is from Michael’s! And the rusty oval one is from a vintage shop – I haven’t even cleaned the glass yet because I love the aged look.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
My husband wasn’t too sure about the goof ring when I explained it to him, but he admits that he doesn’t even notice it and he really likes the new lights, so win win.

Changing out the two can lights with brass and glass pendants has transformed this primary bathroom. I’ll be the first to admit that I’m usually very impatient, but when designing a space, I also enjoy the process and the feeling of getting each part just the way I want it. Lighting is such an important design element; it has the potential to totally update and change an entire space. I hope this post has inspired you to consider lighting in your design plans and to look at your recessed can lights in a new way. Be sure to subscribe to receive DIY and decorating inspiration once a week.

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Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!

We haven’t had a coffee table for years! I love them, love styling them, love the function they add, but having one doesn’t always work out. Our daughters are eight and a half years apart, so we’ve had littles rolling around the ground and jumping off sofas for a while – it just didn’t make sense for the way we used our family room. Then there was the challenge of finding one I loved and was willing to pay for. For years I’ve been searching for vintage pieces to create my own coffee table, checking Facebook Marketplace for a unique piece to restore, but no luck. When I finally found one that I really liked and felt would coordinate with my coordinated living room pieces, it was way out of my budget. So, I decided to build a Pottery Barn coffee table copycat, but not from scratch. Instead, I built a simple cover that slides onto an existing tabletop that I didn’t love so much!

Building the Pottery Barn coffee table copycat was so much fun! I wasn’t too concerned if it didn’t work out because I used the most inexpensive spacer wood I could (aka lattice boards). I knew going in that the boards weren’t exactly the same size, they were rough, and uneven, but I liked those qualities about them because that meant I could easily create a unique piece that looked a little old and rustic with a modern frame. I added the decorative corners at the last minute because I think they add a little more stability to the thin wooden corners, and they add a nice finishing touch too. The best part about this Pottery Barn coffee table copycat is that it lends itself to any design you can think of, and it’s simple enough for anyone to take on.

This DIY project started with this inexpensive coffee table from Walmart. I was really only after the black metal frame and the size. It was actually less expensive for me to buy an entire coffee table over just a black frame to add my own top to. Go figure! It turned out to be better this way though, if my coffee table cover didn’t turn out, I still had a useable table, and the existing top added strength to my cover. Below I’ve included some additional coffee tables that I considered.


Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat
Walmart coffee table

Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

You may look at the affordable Walmart coffee table and think the chevron pattern looks pretty nice and the color is OK, but I was after a thicker looking top without adding a lot of weight. I also wanted to apply my custom stain color to the wood and bring in the herringbone pattern. This Pottery Barn coffee table copycat isn’t an exact match, but it’s definitely inspired and more affordable than the original. The cool part is that both of my daughters have expressed how much they like the new table – which is pretty great to me. Here’s a photo of the original coffee table in our living room before I created a simple cover for it.



Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

Anytime someone says copycat, I feel like it’s normal to expect a duplicate. Well, I’ll be the first to tell you that I didn’t create a duplicate, it’s not perfect or exact, but the Malcolm Pottery Barn coffee table is so beautiful and timeless to me that it inspired my own similar design. I love the mix of modern black metal with the rustic worn top – it feels cozy, a little vintage, but sturdy and fresh in a way. The Malcolm coffee table is longer than mine, uses solid wood, has the designer look and details I love, but when something is outside my budget I always consider if I can make it myself. And this time I decided I would attempt something similar for a fraction of the price. Below you can see the Pottery Barn coffee table that inspired this project.



Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat – Tutorial

The cover that I built started with a piece of scrap plywood I had on hand. I used 1/2-inch plywood so that it was thick enough to nail into, but not too heavy. To get the plywood to fit the top of the coffee table, I just flipped the coffee table upside down and traced around it onto the plywood. Just cut your traced lines. Then I cut a bunch of 12-inch-long lattice pieces. I used about 14 spacer (lattice) boards for the top, and then I was able to use the trimmed off pieces to fill in the rest of the spaces. The video I made showing the process is the best way to demonstrate how the top pattern came together. I was able to use 2″ wide boards to create the border – and these boards were the same thickness as the lattice boards along the top so it doesn’t bulge over the edges at all. You can use any boards you want to wrap and frame the new cover, but I wanted to make sure the cover didn’t overlap with too much thickness away from the frame. My goal wasn’t to create something that looked made, but to create something that looked like it always was. I also found these decorative corner pieces to add a nice detail and some added security for the corners of the coffee table cover.



Once the boards were glued and nailed down (3/8″ brad nails), there were some small spaces in between some boards. The lattice boards aren’t perfectly uniform, so I used wood filler to fill some of the wider spaces. The wood filler claims it can be stained, but there are some places that didn’t stain well. Again, I wasn’t looking for perfection and this outcome didn’t ruin the overall look but be aware of my experience before you begin a similar project. I sanded the entire cover with 180 grit and then 220 grit sandpaper. Once cleaned off, I added Rove + Dwell’s Farmhouse stain. Four hours later, gently sand with a 220-grit sanding sponge, and clean off. Then, I lightly applied Varathane’s whitewash stain and immediately wiped it off. These are the two main steps to achieve my white oak looking stain color. I love the warm and worn look of it, and it’s not too dark for my taste. A matte polyurethane finish was brushed on to protect the surface.


Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat – Video


My Pottery Barn coffee table copycat looks great downstairs as well as upstairs – it’s nice being able to move things around when I want to. Now that I have a coffee table in front of my sofa, I’ve been enjoying the opportunity to style it. Little changes to tabletops are a great way to reuse your decor and refresh a room. I love using a tray to contain and display the decor – check out some of my favorite coffee table decor.







The surface looks old and worn but it’s so smooth and soft.

Style #1 modern farmhouse

Style #2 boho farmhouse

Style #3 vintage farmhouse

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You may also like:

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Have you ever painted an old piece of furniture and gave it new life? I have wanted to paint a vintage piece for the longest time, but all the cleaning, sanding, and prep work always turned me off. Well, that all changed when a friend texted me a photo of this beautiful hutch. I loved the details and the small size of it. It was a solid wood vintage piece with character, but it wasn’t overwhelming. I did some research about chalk painting because you don’t typically have to sand (or sand much) prior to chalk painting. For this chalk paint hutch makeover, I had many choices of chalk paint brands. I think they’re probably all pretty good, it just depends on what color and look you want. After reading a blog post about Behr brand chalk paint, I was sold. And when I get excited about painting (which is never) I just have to go for it and get started. So that’s what I did.

Behr chalk paint has a nice selection of colors, they’re located in a brochure down the spray paint aisle at my Home Depot. I knew I wanted a navy blue with some grey and that’s what I got. I selected onyx gray, but it turned out quite blue compared to the sample dot on the top of the can. I think this may be because the hutch had a lot of red in the wood. I’m only guessing at the reason, but I am very happy with the color even though it’s not the exact color I was expecting. I did paint two coats, but they paint goes on so smoothly that it didn’t take long at all. This chalk paint hutch makeover was so exciting for me and my family. I laid down a drop cloth in the dining room and went to work. My family would walk by and check out my progress, giving nice compliments. It was cool that they were excited to see the transformation too.


Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover – Bathroom refresh

As you will soon see, we’re using the hutch in our upstairs guest bathroom. This was not the original plan for the hutch, it was going to go in our primary bedroom and store all the throw pillows and extra blankets. The hutch even has a drawer which was going to be used for my husband’s physical therapy bands. It seemed like a good idea, but when I moved it into our bedroom in preparation for our flooring repairs, it looked way too small for the space. I even tried pairing a chair and tree with it to make it seem larger, but with our 10-foot ceilings, it just didn’t fit. I instantly thought about the upstairs bathroom because there’s an open space on one side. My husband didn’t think it would fit, but I could picture in there so I measured twice and it turned out to be a perfect.

I love how vintage furniture can add so much interest and character to a space. The prior style of this guest bathroom was pretty modern, maybe with a little boho vibe to it. It was simple and I liked it, but with the addition of the hutch, a mini refresh was in order. When I plan a space, I consider all the elements and use what I already have as much as possible. By introducing blue into this space, I wanted it to look intentional and cohesive, so a few changes needed to happen. The guest bathroom is now a nice blend of modern and vintage, I love the eclectic look and how it all just works. I used frames I already had, a floor mat and hand towel I already had, and plants and decor I already had to decorate the hutch. Adding a new shower curtain and soap dispenser made this refresh affordable and I love how they tied everything together.

You’ll notice a lot of neutrals with warm brass accents and the focal blue tones. I intentionally selected a lighter blue curtain because it brightens the space, coordinates with the dark blue chalk paint, and keeps the space balanced. If I would have matched the shower curtain color with the hutch, it would have weighed too heavily on that side of the bathroom, and I would have lost dimension too. Matching is great but consider coordinating when planning a space. Coordinating can add versatility, dimension, and interest to the space. I would love to replace the vanity light fixture at some point and do a finish on the wall behind the hutch, but for now it’s just fine.


Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover
I used antique gold Rub ‘n Buff to update the hardware and to highlight the art deco details.

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover – Tutorial

I created a video to show the chalk painting process, but I’ll list the basic steps and some tips here.

  1. First, clean the piece thoroughly. Even the bottom~
  2. Then remove any drawers, hardware, and in my case the glass and wood scroll overlay.
  3. If you want to leave any of the original wood finish, carefully tape off the parts that should not get painted.
  4. TIP: Be sure to use a spray bottle to add a little water to your paint. This helps thick chalk paint to go on smoothly. For a cup of paint, I sprayed about 4 sprays of water. Mix thoroughly.
  5. I used a 2″ brush because my hutch has a lot of intricacies and curves.
  6. Just paint the chalk paint on in smooth strokes. Don’t paint over the same spot several times, don’t try to get complete coverage with the first coat, move on and get an even layer of paint on the entire piece. The thickness of the paint seems to cause it to dry more quickly.
  7. Make sure the first layer is completely dry.
  8. Lightly sand the piece with 220 grit and then clean off dust.
  9. Prepare your paint again and give the piece a second coat. Pait can temporarily be stored in the fridge between coats (= no waste).
  10. Once you have the look you want and the piece is dry, remove the tape.
  11. I used my sanding sponge to sand off some of the chalk paint where I wanted wood to show through. Having some dark edges adds beauty and helps it retain that vintage look. Wipe off all the dust from sanding before adding a protective finishing if you want one.
  12. I waited a few days to allow the paint to cure and set before applying a dark wax finish. I used a wax brush and made sure to apply an even layer of wax. You may also add matte polyurethane or nothing. Once the wax is cured, you are left with a silky-smooth finish and a gorgeous luster to the piece.
  13. Once the finishing layer is cured, add hardware back to the piece and style.

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover – Video


Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Refinishing this piece was so satisfying and I was so happy with how well the Behr chalk paint went on. I felt like I couldn’t have messed it up even if I wanted to. I will definitely use Behr chalk paint in the future as long as they have the color I need. And I can’t wait to find another piece to refinish and give new life to. Flipping furniture is not only ultimate recycling, but you can save money and add your own personal touches to go with your style. If you makeover a piece of furniture, be sure to tag me on Instagram so that I can see your creation. And without further ado, here are photos of the guest bathroom with the new vintage piece which provides storage and beauty to this small space.



Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover


Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Chalk Paint Hutch Makeover

Thanks so much for checking out this post. Chalk painting furniture is really easy and getting amazing results so quickly is a game changer. I hope you’re inspired to breathe new life into an older piece of furniture and then enjoy it again. I used Behr chalk paint, but there are several great brands out there, just be sure to spray some water and mix well to get that smooth finish. Below you can shop this space. Thanks again~

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!


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DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

What’s above your sofa? If you have a large wall to decorate above your sofa, you know how difficult it can be finding something large enough or fitting for the space. This space is far from finished, but it’s getting closer with my DIY vintage farmhouse wall art! I’ve tried a few things above the sofa, and I’m sure I’ll try a few more, but this simple look with a large vintage inspired piece is definitely my style. I cannot wait to explain how I got this vertical shiplap look, without planks or a Sharpie marker. My husband had his doubts when I told him what I was doing, but it worked like a charm and perfectly for this DIY.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art
BEFORE

OK, first things first, this DIY vintage farmhouse wall art project can be completely customized for your style. My sign is 5 feet wide by 3 feet tall. Just check out my video and the instructions below and then think about customizing the size, colors, and image. I recreated the image after seeing some wall art at one of my favorite vintage shops, 417 Vintage Market & Supply Co, in Branson Missouri. The price tag was $200 so I decided to use the scrap wood in my garage and create my own. You can use any thickness of plywood, but the thinner the plywood, the lighter the entire piece. You will also need a projector unless you can draw the typography. Here’s the video showing all the steps, start to finish. Be sure to notice that the wall sconce is not hardwired – there are links to the lighting below.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – Video


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – Tutorial

To get started, gather your supplies and tools, you can be flexible and use what you have on hand.

  1. Determine the width and height of your wall art
  2. Measure and mark the desired size onto the plywood
  3. You can cut the plywood at this point (I actually primed my plywood because I had primer out already)
  4. If you want shiplap lines (vertical or horizontal), measure and mark the lines
  5. Use a Dremel tool to drill an indent over the shiplap lines – be sure to use a straight edge and move quickly to keep the Dremel moving
  6. Paint the plywood the background color (black, white, and cream are my favorites)
  7. Create your background image using Canva, use my image, or find one online. As long as you don’t sell the wall art and there’s no copywrite it’s fine to use for your own purposes
  8. Set up the projector, project the image onto the plywood, trace your image using a pencil
  9. Use paint or a Sharpie paint marker to fill in your traced image – allow to fully dry
  10. Use an orbital, palm, or sponge sander to add age and worn spots over the entire piece – I vacuumed off the saw dust at the end
  11. Measure, cut, and nail scrap boards to the backside of the plywood perfectly lined up along the edge – this is what you will attach the frame to
  12. Measure, cut, and nail frame boards around the edge. You can do fancy 45-degree cuts or just square corners like I did. One of my boards was a smidge short, but I used it instead of buying a new board – it’s hardly noticeable and adds the vintage style~
  13. Add hanging hardware, and hang

This DIY vintage farmhouse wall art was so much fun to make and watch my vision come to life. Like I mentioned earlier, I have more plans for this space so be sure to subscribe to my blog, get your free shelf styling eBook, and one email a week with DIY or decorating ideas. I’ve also included a few photos of how I decorated above the sofa leading up to this DIY wall art.

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art
I used black acrylic craft paint and a black paint Sharpie marker for the small print.

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – Shop this space

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – More ways to style above the sofa

10 Reasons to Decorate with Plants

Vintage Inspired Christmas Home Tour


How to Plant a Staghorn Fern on a Board



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Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Our youngest daughter, Quinn, got the smallest bedroom in the house (approx. 11’x11′). She doesn’t know or realize this fact, and she probably wouldn’t care, but it does make decorating the room a little tricky. How is it that the person with the most junk has the smallest space to store it?! Quinn is seven and occasionally plays in her room, otherwise it’s used for sleeping and working at her desk. So, I organized the room by having an area for sleep and study. For this small space living: girls bedroom ideas post, I’m so excited to share with you Quinn’s study area!


Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas
Vintage kitchen drawers from a demolished kitchen.

Last week I shared the design and construction of her sleeping area. I added shiplap to the wall, designed and constructed built-ins for each side of her bed, and installed a wall sconce. The built-ins organize her little toys, books, and keepsakes. Using upward storage saves on space and makes it easy to see all your stuff. Be sure to check out the YouTube video to see how it all came together. Read the post here.


Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Today, I’m happy to share a very easy DIY project that can be done with crates, suitcases, bins, drawers, or even trays. The concept is to transform a box shaped item to create a large shadow box which adds a decorative element to the space and creates an area to display treasures. The concept is simple, and the steps are even simpler. You can also check out the short TikTok video I made (although it’s missing some of the steps covered in this post).



Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

My shadow boxes are made from vintage kitchen drawers. I loved the idea of repurposing furniture to create unique decor so when I found these kitchen drawers on Facebook Marketplace, I knew they were perfect (and cheap). I was looking for smaller drawers, either from a kid’s dresser or in this case an old kitchen, that were shallow so that they didn’t stick out from the wall too much. Smaller drawers also meant that they wouldn’t weigh a ton.

  1. I cleaned the drawers, replaced the gross bottom of one of them, and sanded off some rough spots.
  2. I sawed off the bottom edge of each drawer front. This allows the drawer to lie flat against the wall.
  3. I painted the front facing edge the same blue I used on the shiplap in the room. Sherwin Williams – Fresh Idea
  4. These drawers aren’t huge, but they were large enough that they required a large piece of paper to cover the bottom of the drawer. I found this beautiful gift wrap to use. Just measure the drawer bottom and cut the paper to fit perfectly.
  5. Paint an even layer of Mod Podge on the drawer bottom and then place the cute gift wrap over it. I used an old gift card to smooth out the paper. Allow to dry.
  6. You can also paint Mod Podge over the top of the paper, if you want.
  7. Finally, add hanging hardware to the back of each box.

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas

These shadow boxes have a ton of character with their vintage edges, old paint marks, and the new decorative paper inside. My daughter loves placing her treasures in various boxes – watching her decide where to place items is so fun to watch. She even stands on a chair, reaching for the highest box to keep certain things out of reach from her sister. In keeping with the bird theme, I used a glue gun to attach feathers to a branch from our backyard and then hung it above her desk. It’s whimsical and so pretty in-person, but most importantly Quinn loves it. Quinn’s study area has gotten a lot of action since it’s installation and I couldn’t be happier with how this small space living design turned out. Let me know if you have any questions and let me know what you think down below in the comments. I hope this Small Space Living: Girls Bedroom Ideas post has inspired you to repurpose vintage items to add function and beauty to your small space.

Be sure to check Pinterest for more ways to use vintage drawers.


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This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!

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Modern Farmhouse Built-in Bookshelves


Modern Farmhouse Built-in Bookshelves

DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves

The smallest bedroom in the house belongs to our little princess, Quinn. She outgrew her toddler bunkbed and Ikea kids table so it was time to design a space that would work for her within the small space. When I approach any space, I sort out how the room needs to function. Quinn needed a place to sleep, do artwork and crafts, and have some storage for her toys, books, and knick knacks. And with her bedroom at the end of the hallway, I had to consider how I arranged the room so that she wouldn’t be distracted at night with everyone else being awake. So, one side of the bedroom has her bed and built-in bookshelves, and the other side is for her desk. There are some things to consider and details to notice, but these DIY modern farmhouse custom built-in bookshelves couldn’t have been easier to design and create!


DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves

DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves

When designing the built-ins bookshelves, I considered that they would be attached to the wall studs. I considered various wall treatments or just a treatment inside the bookshelves, and ultimately decided on horizontal modern farmhouse shiplap. You can learn how to install shiplap by checking out my boho farmhouse shiplap tutorial. Before installing the shiplap, I found the wall studs and noted them since my stud finder won’t detect the studs through the shiplap boards. This little step made it easy to locate the wall studs and attach the custom built-in bookshelves later on. I also made sure the shelves weren’t too tall, but that they were a fairly standard size in case I want to move them elsewhere someday. I also wanted to install a wall sconce light in between the bookshelves, so I had to find the stud that I would install the sconce to before finalizing the built-in bookshelves’ locations.

Quinn has a twin sized bed which fits in between the built-in bookshelves. I also made sure that I had the option to arrange her desk between the bookshelves as well. Taking some time to consider how else the room can be arranged, will allow you to install built-ins in their correct location, one time. I love having the flexibility to swap her bed and desk, and I think the summer months are a great time for this change since getting a great night’s rest isn’t as crucial. Another consideration when designing built-ins is to note any outlets and light switch locations. There are two outlets on the wall, so I was able to place a surge protector extension cord under the bottom shiplap board and now it’s accessible to use under her bed. We currently plug in her wall sconce and white noise machine into that surge protector.


DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves

Although the bedroom is small, it also has a small walk-in closet with a full-sized door. When I decided on the bookshelf depth, I had to make sure the door could fully open. These DIY modern farmhouse custom built-in bookshelves have two cubby spaces along the bottom. These cubbies were sized to fit some felt bins that I already had on hand. The bins are full of stuffed animals and some art supplies, and the best part is that she can easily slide the bins in and out without damaging the wood. The rest of the bookshelf has adjustable shelves. I don’t know what types of items she’ll have on them down the road, so adjustable shelves made the most sense. I gathered all her stuff and sorted it out on her shelves with the purpose being storage, not just decorative. However, storage functionality doesn’t mean that the items can’t be arranged in an organized and decorative way too. I spaced out her books, used bins on both shelves for a balanced look, and kept as much negative space as I could to reduce a cluttered feel.


DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves


If you like styled shelves, but struggle with how to start, be sure to subscribe to my blog so that you’ll get one email a week sharing my latest project as well as my free shelf styling ebook. I think you’ll love my approach and easy to follow recipe for beautifully styled shelves. My recipe wasn’t followed for these DIY modern farmhouse custom built-in bookshelves because their primary function is storage, not decorative, but I think her storage looks pretty cute too.

With bookshelves on each side of her bed, I installed a wall sconce instead of placing a lamp on one of the shelves. The wall sconce is so cute, and the dimmer switch is really nice when tucking her in at night. The wall sconce will also work well when her desk is located between the bookshelves. To save money and to not have a permanent feature, I used a plug-in wall sconce and then covered the cord with a paintable cord cover. I love how it blends in and provides a finished look.


DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves

DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves – How to

The steps to design and build DIY modern farmhouse custom built-in bookshelves is easy. After you note the studs, any outlets etc., and determine all possible furniture layouts, you’re ready to design.

  1. Measure the width of your wall.
  2. Measure the width of any furniture that will be paired with the built-ins, if any and make sure it will all fit.
  3. Use the Shelf Help Now configurator to try out your measurements and have a visual of the built-in you want.
  4. You can also order the wood for your design directly from Shelf Help Now – they have standard depths to choose from (consider how deep your built-in will be at this point).
  5. Once designed, you can either order your wood from them or you can use the design to create your own cut list.
  6. Download a copy of your design, this will show you how to assemble the pieces for the best stability. I used pocket hole construction to build the bookshelves.
  7. Once assembled, paint or stain the built-ins. This post shows how to achieve the stain color I have on these built-ins.
  8. Once finished, position the built-ins where you want them attached to the wall. Double check measurements and try to attach the piece into at least two studs if possible.
  9. Once in position, predrill the holes to attach to the wall studs and then use three-inch screws to secure the built-ins to the wall.

DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves – Video tutorial


DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves

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This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!


DIY Modern Farmhouse Custom Built-in Bookshelves

Thank you for checking out this post. If you have any questions, please leave me a comment below~ Adding storage cubbies and shelves has been a great way to save space in Quinn’s small bedroom. The room looks and feels bigger now, the built-ins with her bed fit the space so nicely. The other side of her room functions as her craft and study center with a space for her cherished items. Quinn loves displaying items and she adores birds and butterflies, so I found a fun way to give her a space to show off her treasures. Coming soon…

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Awesome Modern Farmhouse DIY Floating Shelves

Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves

When we built our home, we had ‘upgrade’ options to choose from which also upgraded the price. We opted out of most of them because of my DIY plans, or because we didn’t care about the option. One upgrade option was to have built-ins installed on each side of our living room fireplace. The decision to skip the upgrade was easy because I knew I would be adding my own floating shelves one day. And that day finally came, although the project spanned months instead of weeks to complete these awesome DIY modern farmhouse floating shelves.

My timeline to complete these floating shelves was longer because of the 2021 wood shortages, and I ran into some hiccups along the way. However, my learning curve should help you to fast track your way to building floating shelves much more quickly. The best part about this project is that the shelves turned out exactly how I envisioned them. My husband likes them so much he was trying to talk me into building matching ones in the kitchen nook.


Awesome Modern Farmhouse DIY Floating Shelves
This focal wall is just waiting to shine with some awesome modern farmhouse DIY floating shelves!

The awesome DIY modern farmhouse floating shelves add so much character and interest to the space, and I have had so much fun styling these shelves as a pair. Styling shelves is one of my favorite things to do, my brain starts restyling shelves everywhere I go even if the existing styling doesn’t need it. When you subscribe to my blog, you will receive my free ebook on how to style shelves. The ebook isn’t too long, it’s full of photos, and it’s where I share my easy-to-follow recipe on how to style beautifully decorated shelves. If you have shelves for a pantry, storage closet, or library – they are most likely for storage and organization which doesn’t mean they can’t look pretty too, but my recipe isn’t for storage shelving. Decorative shelf styling has negative space and patterns – and once you read my book, you will never look at a shelf the same way again.


Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves

I never start a DIY project without finding my own inspiration and clear instructions on how I will approach my project. The main blog that guided me to select the bracket system I used was, Christine at Honey Built Home. I loved that Christine used 2×3 boards and pocket holes to create her sleek floating shelf brackets. I felt comfortable with this approach, so I began by measuring my alcoves and planning out how many 2×3 boards I would need. I located and marked the wall studs too and headed off to the Home Depot. Here’s a photo of just the bracket construction.


Awesome Modern Farmhouse DIY Floating Shelves
2×3 boards and pocket holes

Besides feeling confident that I could create this style of bracket with no problems, I also liked that this sleek and strong bracket, along with two pieces of half inch plywood would create a thickness that could be finished with a 1″ x 2.5″ select pine board along the front. All the wood I would need for these awesome DIY modern farmhouse floating shelves was all off-the-shelf lumber at my local Home Depot, and it wouldn’t break the bank! Had I known there would be plywood shortages, I would have stocked up on what I needed at this point, but as they say, hindsight is 20/20. To determine the vertical space between my shelves, I used some painter’s tape to layout my design. I wanted to make sure that the shelves would look how I wanted them to and that they would fit around the outlets, light switch, and fireplace port. Seventeen inches between each shelf was the sweet spot for my shelves and I liked the taller space left at the bottom. The floor space is used to store our cable box, game station, and cords. Right now, I’m using vintage suitcases to store the technology, but I will probably try some other looks to decorate the floor space in the future.


Awesome Modern Farmhouse DIY Floating Shelves

Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves

Once all the shelf brackets are level, installed into the wall studs and secure, it’s time to cut the plywood shelf tops and bottoms. I thought this would be the easy part, cutting rectangles couldn’t be too difficult, right? I’ve heard that even new construction rarely has a perfectly square walls, but it honestly didn’t occur to me until I measured my first shelf. How in the world was the width shorter in the front than in the back, and then the wall came in even more towards the center! I felt so frustrated and worried. How was I going to get the right cuts for my shelves without having half-inch caulking in some spots? The answer came to me by my research-a-holic husband. Jeremy gave me my answer like it was so simple, he said you have to scribe the wood.

After watching some videos on scribing wood and how it allows the wood to perfectly line up with uneven walls, I knew this was the right way to cut my plywood shelves. I started out with one scriber, and it didn’t give me the accurate results I wanted, so I ended up with AccuScribe Pro. I prefer this scribing tool because it was easy to lock into place and secure the settings I needed. There are several ways to adjust the tool to make it work with your walls and wood. It was worth the price because it did the job without hassle, and I could use the tool with ease. Each time a shelf was scribed, I set it into place to make sure it was a good fit before moving on.

Here’s a photo of my top shelf boards set into place. Once I scribed the top boards, I just cut a duplicate for the underside board because the wall didn’t change much in their close proximity. However, all five shelves that I scribed were all slightly different, so I had to scribe five times on each side to make sure I had snuggly fitting shelves. I then used my Dewalt jigsaw to cut my scribed lines and having this powerful tool with a finish blade cut my wood like butter. Using quality tools creates quality projects and makes the process so much easier. I also had to make sure that the brackets didn’t extend beyond the plywood. The bracket boards had to line up with the plywood so that I could securely attach the front face boards.


Make sure the top and bottom boards are flush with the fronts of the bracket.

Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves – Front face boards

I wanted to make sure all my wood (plywood and pine boards) was cut and ready for sanding and staining, so next, I measured the width of each bracket in front. I wanted a snug fit for the front face board, but not tight. With the pine boards cut and fitting securely, they were also ready for sanding and staining.

Once the wood was cut and each piece of plywood was scribed and labeled for placement, I began the sanding process. After gaining staining experience from my vintage farmhouse table, I knew exactly how I wanted the floating shelves to look. I love the look of worn and weathered wood, but the texture of actual weathered wood isn’t always easy to clean and dust. I can’t believe how half inch plywood was transformed to look like high-end custom shelves – it still blows me away. I sanded each shelf (20 total) and 10 pieces of pine for the face front boards with three grits of sandpaper using my orbital sander. I start with 80 grit, then 120 grit, and finished with 220 grit. I sand in our driveway and then blow off the dust with our leaf blower.


Awesome Modern Farmhouse DIY Floating Shelves

Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves – Staining

Once all the wood is sanded and ready to receive the stain, I wipe them down again to remove all dust and debris from sanding. This is the annoying step for me. After all that sanding who wants to clean?! With all the shelves ready, I applied an even layer of wood conditioner, leaving no puddles, but not spending too much time for a perfect application. Just make sure you get full coverage with an even application and move on to the next board. It dries rather quickly and after 30 minutes you can apply your first coat of stain if you want.

My staining process is easy, and I can’t believe I’m saying this, but it is also fun. I was initially so intimidated by stain and worried about getting an even coat with a brush, but once I discovered staining pads, my confidence grew, and I am able to achieve my signature color every time. Here are the simple steps I used to stain my awesome DIY modern farmhouse floating shelves:

  1. Sand outside-showing surfaces with 80, 120, and 220 grit paper using an orbital sander
  2. Thoroughly clean sanded surfaces
  3. Apply one coat of wood conditioner (allow to dry for at least 30 min.)
  4. Wearing gloves, use a staining pad to rub on and rub off an even application of Old Barn Living Farmhouse stain (allow to dry for recommended 4 hours)
  5. Give a light sanding with a 220-sanding sponge, and clean all dust off
  6. Wearing gloves, use a staining pad to lightly rub on and rub off an even application of Varathane white wash stain – be sure to rub off all excess and to rub-in bright spots of the white wash. This stain tends to dry quickly so work in smaller areas to make sure it’s evenly rubbed on.
  7. Apply an even layer of matte polyurethane to protect the finish

Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves – Installation

Once the wood was stained and done, the installation process went by quickly. I installed the bottom piece of plywood using a brad nail gun and wood glue. You may need the help of clamps at this point. Then install the top shelf board with more wood glue where it meets the bracket and then brad nail into place. At this point, the shelves were really taking shape and looking good. With the face front boards ready to go, I added some wood glue and smoothed it on to avoid dripping, and then I clamped it into place before nailing it into each bracket board. You’ll want to select straight pine boards because any bowing will affect the look once installed.

I had just a few boards that bowed at one end and to make sure it stayed straight, I clamped it in place when I glued and nailed it in. Then I left the clamps on overnight to make sure there wouldn’t be movement during the glue drying process.


Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves – Video tutorial

Those are the basic steps, with some tips along the way, but if you learn better by watching, you’ll want to check out my YouTube video when I show you the whole process. Be sure to have your volume up and feel free to send me any questions that come up along the way. I’m so happy that these awesome DIY modern farmhouse floating shelves are done and I’m even happier about how beautifully they turned out – I can’t believe that I created custom floating shelves and I’m here to tell you that you can too! Every DIY project that I tackle gives me more confidence for the next. There will be learning moments and mistakes, but I hope to help you to avoid those same mishaps.


Awesome DIY Modern Farmhouse Floating Shelves – Video tutorial


Thank you for checking out this post. I hope it is helpful and encouraging for you to take on the next DIY project that you have in mind. If I can construct and build, anyone can. Be sure to subscribe to my blog and get your free shelf styling ebook – you will get excited about styling shelves after learning my easy-to-follow recipe!


Awesome Modern Farmhouse DIY Floating Shelves
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Handmade wooden Valentine's Card

Handmade Wooden Valentine’s Card

I didn’t always like Valentine’s Day, but I sure do now! This year, I’m even throwing a 1950’s inspired Galentine’s party for some friends. We’re going to enjoy snacks, dessert, and spend some time crafting this handmade wooden Valentine’s card. I love handmade anything, but especially cards or sentimental things. It’s the time that someone took that means so much to me. Well, this handmade wooden Valentine’s Card is easy to make, but you can customize and personalize it in endless ways (or keep it simple and go crazy with the envelope like I did). I hope you love how easy this card is to make and that you’re inspired to make your own handmade Valentine’s using this technique!

Last year, my husband and I created handmade Valentine’s with our daughters. They still talk about how much fun it was and how crazy Dad’s cards were. So now, it’s gotta be an annual tradition for us. I will participate, but what they don’t know is that their real card from me will each be one of these handmade wooden Valentine’s cards! I think photos are the sweetest way to personalize this Valentine card design, but The Graphics Fairy has a ton of free vintage images to choose from too. The basic idea is to use this iron-on wood transfer paper onto very thin wooden postcards. Here are the step-by-step instructions to show you just how easy this card is to make. I think you’re going to love this easy concept and think of other ways to use this idea!



Step 1:

Select photos or images to print on one 8.5″ x 11″ piece of wood transfer paper. Make sure the picture fits the size of the wooden postcard (or that you can cut it down to size). I use Canva to perfectly size images for printing. I used 4×6″ wooden postcards, but they come in many sizes. I inserted the photos into a Word document and printed on the transfer paper (blue stripe side faces down). The backside of the transfer paper has a blue stripe, so be sure to print your photos onto the front side.

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

Step 2:

Cut the image to fit the wooden postcard. I just set the wooden postcard on top of my photos and traced around it. I printed the photos a little bit bigger on purpose so that I didn’t have a white border.

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

Step 3:

Carefully remove the backside of the paper. Set it on top of the wooden postcard, perfectly lined up and ready to be transferred.

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

Step 4:

Lay a piece of parchment paper over the lined up wooden postcard and photo. Frankie was quite helpful during this process~

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

Step 5:

Turn on your iron to its highest setting (no steam) and carefully press down onto the parchment/transfer/postcard. Don’t leave the iron sitting in one spot too long, 3 second intervals should do the trick. Move the iron all over the image until you can see the image through the parchment, and it looks a little waxy.

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

Step 6:

Allow the transfer and wooden postcard to completely cool down. Once it’s cool, you can remove the transfer paper and see your work-of-art!

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

Handmade Wooden Valentine's Card

This was such a fun handmade card to create. I have already thought of some other possibilities for this wood transfer paper – I just love how the wood grain shows through. I also had so much fun making the envelopes fun and fancy! I think Jeremy will appreciate the creative envelope, but he’ll absolutely treasure the photo card. And I’ll write him a message on the back of the wooden postcard since it is after all a Valentine~ I hope this post inspired your crafty side and spending some time to make Valentine’s cards this year~

804 Sycamore - Amy

Video tutorial:

@804_sycamore

#valentinecraft #valentinecard #valentinecardmaking #diyvalentine #diyvalentinecrafts #woodcards #handmadegifts #madewithlove

♬ original sound – Amy

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