DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

My husband and I have walked through Restoration Hardware a dozen times, admiring their designs and styling, and never once buying a thing. This changed when one of their kitchen pendant lights were very reasonably priced, and the quality was a standout compared to the others we were looking at. I’m not sure I’ll ever own a home worthy of their grand designs, or that my budget will ever allow it, but I love the style and inspiration this brand provides me. I have been looking for a piece of furniture to live across from the formal dining room. It’s a little nook and walkway so it’s been tricky. I finally came up with a solution, a DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart!

The journey to finally just build this piece has been long and winding. I first saw an amazing vintage bakers rack at 417 Vintage Market in Branson Missouri. Then I found a large rolling cart for gardening supplies at The Junk Ranch show in Prairie Grove Arkansas. Both were out of budget and I’m not sure they would have fit in my SUV anyway. It only recently occurred to me that I could and should build something when I stumbled upon Ana White’s rolling shelf build. With so much amazing inspiration, it was time to sketch out and plan my DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart. Here’s the original that inspired it all:


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

There are many other similar versions of this rolling cart for sell, but when you DIY, you can customize the exact size, color, and style you want (plus save a lot of $$). When we first moved into this house, I placed a tall bookcase in this space across from the dining room, the bookcase also used to be in the dining room of our previous home. So, I already knew what a tall bookcase looked like in this space, and it didn’t allow for much to go above it. I wanted a rolling cart that was tall enough to be useful, but not too tall that I couldn’t use the wall space above it. So, I built my DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart long, and not as tall. Here are the exact dimensions of my design: 6′ wide, 50″ tall, 14″ deep. Adding two-inch nonskid wheels brings the total height to 52″. This design can be created to fit any space you want. I used 2×8 boards as the center board of my shelves because I had them on hand. However, if you need deeper or more shallow shelves, you can create whatever size shelves you need.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart
Here’s a pic of our custom-built home in Oregon. That bookcase has been all around and is currently upstairs in our bonus room holding craft bins.

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

You may have noticed that my support rods across the back of each shelf are wood dowels. After pricing out various pipe, I decided wood dowels were much more my speed and I already had the drill bit to create the one-inch diameter hole that I needed. I stained the dowels with the cart, and I love how it looks less industrial and a little more vintage. However, you could use PVC pipe and paint it, or if it’s your style and in your budget, copper piping would also be stunning. So many possibilities – all customizable.


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DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

I created a video (below) to show the process of building this DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart, but I will list the basic steps here as well:

  1. Determine your dimensions and list out your shelf lengths. The top shelf is the longest because it sets on top of the vertical corner support boards. The inside shelves will be a total of three inches shorter because they fit inside the vertical corner support boards. And the bottom shelf has the inside 2×8 board the same length as the top shelf, but the outside 2×4 shelf boards are shorter like the inside shelves. Ana White created the image above to show her dimensions, but I want you to notice the lengths of boards for each shelf. Design your DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart and create a cut list for your pieces. Here is a link to my cut list.
  2. Assemble the shelves. I drilled pocket holes in the 2×4 boards and then attached them to each side 0f the 2×8. This construction created my 14″ deep shelves. Drill 1.5″ pocket holes and use 2.5″ pocket hole screws. I plugged the pocket holes on the top shelf because I thought the underside may be seen. You can plug all the holes, none, or the top shelves – your preference.
  3. Add the four vertical support boards. I also drilled pocket holes at the corners of the inside shelves. I added the four 2×4 corners to the bottom shelf first, then I added the top shelf, and lastly installed the in between shelves. For the top and bottom shelves I used 3″ self-drilling wood screws instead of pocket holes, but be sure to predrill holes to prevent the wood from splitting.
  4. I turned my assembled rolling cart onto one side and drilled my one-inch holes for the back support dowels. Be sure to measure carefully. I centered the hole on the 2×4 and then measured up 6″ inches from the shelf. I didn’t want my back support to be perfectly centered, so I adjusted it down a bit to look right to me. Add the wooden dowels by twisting and pushing. I centered the wooden dowel so that a little was hanging out on each side. Then I used a multitool to cut the end flush.
  5. Now it’s time to sand. I sanded down all the surfaces using 80 grit paper on my orbital sander. Then I finished with 220 grit. I usually do at least three grits, sometimes four on more finished pieces, but some of the boards had a reddish tint and the whole piece was more rustic and vintage so I wasn’t concerned about a perfectly finished look. I also hoped the white wash technique would even out the different colored boards.
  6. Dust and wipe after sanding and then add a preconditioner to the wood. This quick step also allows the wood to evenly absorb the stain. It dried quickly, but wait at least 30 min. before applying your first coat of stain.
  7. Be sure to follow the instructions on your stain. I used Rove & Dwell’s farmhouse interior stain. I use a staining sponge to evenly apply the beautiful color. Once dry, I used a 220 grit sanding sponge to smooth things out. Dust and wipe, and then apply the white wash stain. The particular white wash stain I used said to not sand between coats of white wash. I applied two coats of the white wash stain. Brush it on, let it sit for 3 minutes and then I used a staining sponge to wipe up the excess. You can add extra protection by adding a layer of matte finish polyurethane.
  8. Once dry, add the non-marking casters and any other decorative brackets you want. I did not use the screws that came with the corner brackets because they wouldn’t have worked with all my pocket hole screws. Instead, I used upholstery brass nails and they look and worked perfectly. The bracket is purely decorative, so two nails hold it just fine.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

Full disclosure: My rolling cart has a little wobble. However, once I added some decor it helped. The most frustrating part of this design is that all the wood isn’t perfectly straight and square. This is especially true when using the cheapest common 2×4 boards I could find. Even if you check for bowed boards at the store, it’s just impossible to get every board perfectly straight. I’m sure there are tricks to correcting this, but in my beginner status, I’m still learning. And even with the imperfections I’m very happy with the way this DIY Restoration Hardware inspired rolling cart turned out. It looks better than I pictured and styling it is going to be so much fun. There aren’t a lot of places this new piece can fit in this home, but I’m so excited to enjoy it until I build my dream piece for this spot. Be sure to subscribe to my blog to get decorating and DIY inspiration and tutorials – including this dream piece of furniture I will make in the future.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart
Here’s a quick photo of the dining room – the space that faces this little nook.

DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

Well, that’s it – our new little rolling cart is done and I’m so glad I made a piece of furniture for this spot. Thank you so much for checking out this post. I hope it was helpful and inspiring. This last photo is how the cart is styled as I write this post. I’m sure it will be changing again soon, but with every little tweak I like it even more. Be sure to follow me on Instagram where I post more decorating photos and videos. Take care and be safe while building your DIY dreams.


DIY Restoration Hardware Inspired Rolling Cart

How to Convert a Can Light

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

Our home is a little over a year old, but there are so many things I want to do to it. The builder gave us a handful of lighting packages to choose from. This means I got to pick my favorite out of packages that I didn’t really like too much. We couldn’t modify anything, bring in our own lights, and for the first year of homeownership, we had to use their electrician for any work we wanted done. I was anxiously waiting for the one-year warranty to be up so that I could make some changes. One of the changes that I waited to do was the lighting in our primary bathroom. The vanity lights will be different someday, but for now, I learned how to convert a can light to a pendant light and these pendants add so much character. The brass accents on the pendants also visual warmth to the space and the bulbs create a nice mood lighting too.

This post will not explain the technical steps I took to convert a can light to a pendant light (liability and stuff). But I will tell you what I used and share my tips. If electrical work scares you or you are hesitant to DIY a lighting project, be sure to contact an electrician. It’s not worth the risk. When I tackled this DIY lighting conversion, I triple checked to make sure the electricity was off, I reread the instructions multiple times (to make sure I understood and because they weren’t very well written~). I felt comfortable attempting this project and had my husband double check my work. Doing electrical work, yourself can lead to house fires and even electrocution, be careful and consider your risks before attempting any home DIY.


How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

After I selected the pendant lights that would replace the two can lights, I made note of the diameter of the base. I needed to know if the new pendant base would cover the hole in the ceiling left by the can light. Unless you’re replacing a can light with a large flush mount light, it’s fairly likely that you’ll need a goof ring to go between the new light and the ceiling. These can be painted to match your ceiling and I barely notice ours. However, this look isn’t for everyone in which case you’ll need a drywall dude to come and make some repairs which will cost more than the goof ring, but it may be worth it to you. You will also want to take note of what bulb wattage the new lighting takes. If you need bright light, make sure your fixtures can take high wattage bulbs.

I purchased a two pack of converters because I had two can lights to convert and it was cheaper, but you can get just one or larger packs too. I unboxed the kit and studied the directions and got a good understanding of what I’d be doing with all the parts and the order to do them in. I read the instructions so many times my eyes felt like crossing, but it’s better to be confident than confused. So, once you have the new light fixture, the goof ring, and the converter kit, you’re ready to make the change.

In addition to double checking to see if the electricity was on, I used a non contact voltage detector. It’s better to be safe than sorry and it gave me peace of mind to know I made the checks before touching electrical wires. I created a video (below) showing how to convert a can light to a pendant light, but it’s mainly to show the process and steps. Everyone’s home has a positive and a negative electrical wire for the lighting but depending on the age of your home and building codes, wire colors may differ from mine and construction is sometimes just strange. If you watch the video, don’t use it as a tutorial, but as a general guide to show you the basic steps taken and how easy it is to convert your lighting.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

Here are the items I used to convert a can light to a pendant light:

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. As an Amazon Associate, I may also earn from qualifying purchases. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!



How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

I found a site that offers custom goof rings. You can determine the inner and outer diameter so that you can cover any sized hole once the can light is removed. Some goof rings can be painted or found in other finishes like bronze, brass, black, etc. With the addition of pendant lights in our primary bathroom, my next project is updating the vanity lights, mirrors, and adding a decorative touch. Step by step our bathroom is coming together. Here are some progress shots of the space but be sure to subscribe to get updates when more is completed.



How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
I removed my wall pegs behind the tub because this vintage door made into a shelf was a perfect fit and gives the space pretty vintage vibes. Plus, I added glass knobs to give me those functional pegs back~

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
If you have seen Escape to the Chateau on Netflix, then you will notice that I hung a Union Jack flag just like Angel did above their tub. I love the look and it adds a touch of character and color above the privacy Roman shade.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
One of the things I love about these pendant lights is how pretty they look when they’re off. You will see their pretty glow in the YouTube video, but during the daytime they’re also so lovely.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
Here’s a close-up of my vintage door shelf. I love the natural chippy paint and repurposed piece in here. It gives me a shelf and knobs to hang bath time essentials.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
Do you have a clock in your bathroom? I have this little brass clock from Target in each bathroom because it seems like time just flies when in this room – especially for my teenaged daughter! Maybe in retirement I’ll look at the clock less, but for now it seems my day is ruled by it.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
I just love abstract landscapes, the older the better. The bottom frame is from Michael’s! And the rusty oval one is from a vintage shop – I haven’t even cleaned the glass yet because I love the aged look.

How to Convert a Can Light to a Pendant Light
My husband wasn’t too sure about the goof ring when I explained it to him, but he admits that he doesn’t even notice it and he really likes the new lights, so win win.

Changing out the two can lights with brass and glass pendants has transformed this primary bathroom. I’ll be the first to admit that I’m usually very impatient, but when designing a space, I also enjoy the process and the feeling of getting each part just the way I want it. Lighting is such an important design element; it has the potential to totally update and change an entire space. I hope this post has inspired you to consider lighting in your design plans and to look at your recessed can lights in a new way. Be sure to subscribe to receive DIY and decorating inspiration once a week.

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DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

What’s above your sofa? If you have a large wall to decorate above your sofa, you know how difficult it can be finding something large enough or fitting for the space. This space is far from finished, but it’s getting closer with my DIY vintage farmhouse wall art! I’ve tried a few things above the sofa, and I’m sure I’ll try a few more, but this simple look with a large vintage inspired piece is definitely my style. I cannot wait to explain how I got this vertical shiplap look, without planks or a Sharpie marker. My husband had his doubts when I told him what I was doing, but it worked like a charm and perfectly for this DIY.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art
BEFORE

OK, first things first, this DIY vintage farmhouse wall art project can be completely customized for your style. My sign is 5 feet wide by 3 feet tall. Just check out my video and the instructions below and then think about customizing the size, colors, and image. I recreated the image after seeing some wall art at one of my favorite vintage shops, 417 Vintage Market & Supply Co, in Branson Missouri. The price tag was $200 so I decided to use the scrap wood in my garage and create my own. You can use any thickness of plywood, but the thinner the plywood, the lighter the entire piece. You will also need a projector unless you can draw the typography. Here’s the video showing all the steps, start to finish. Be sure to notice that the wall sconce is not hardwired – there are links to the lighting below.


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – Video


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – Tutorial

To get started, gather your supplies and tools, you can be flexible and use what you have on hand.

  1. Determine the width and height of your wall art
  2. Measure and mark the desired size onto the plywood
  3. You can cut the plywood at this point (I actually primed my plywood because I had primer out already)
  4. If you want shiplap lines (vertical or horizontal), measure and mark the lines
  5. Use a Dremel tool to drill an indent over the shiplap lines – be sure to use a straight edge and move quickly to keep the Dremel moving
  6. Paint the plywood the background color (black, white, and cream are my favorites)
  7. Create your background image using Canva, use my image, or find one online. As long as you don’t sell the wall art and there’s no copywrite it’s fine to use for your own purposes
  8. Set up the projector, project the image onto the plywood, trace your image using a pencil
  9. Use paint or a Sharpie paint marker to fill in your traced image – allow to fully dry
  10. Use an orbital, palm, or sponge sander to add age and worn spots over the entire piece – I vacuumed off the saw dust at the end
  11. Measure, cut, and nail scrap boards to the backside of the plywood perfectly lined up along the edge – this is what you will attach the frame to
  12. Measure, cut, and nail frame boards around the edge. You can do fancy 45-degree cuts or just square corners like I did. One of my boards was a smidge short, but I used it instead of buying a new board – it’s hardly noticeable and adds the vintage style~
  13. Add hanging hardware, and hang

This DIY vintage farmhouse wall art was so much fun to make and watch my vision come to life. Like I mentioned earlier, I have more plans for this space so be sure to subscribe to my blog, get your free shelf styling eBook, and one email a week with DIY or decorating ideas. I’ve also included a few photos of how I decorated above the sofa leading up to this DIY wall art.

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art
I used black acrylic craft paint and a black paint Sharpie marker for the small print.

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art

DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – Shop this space

This post may contain affiliate links. This means I may receive a small commission from each purchase, at no cost to you. Thank you for using my links to help keep this blog going!


DIY Vintage Farmhouse Wall Art – More ways to style above the sofa

10 Reasons to Decorate with Plants

Vintage Inspired Christmas Home Tour


How to Plant a Staghorn Fern on a Board



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Awesome Modern Farmhouse DIY Floating Shelves

Stunning and Easy DIY Wall Treatment

Vintage farmhouse bedroom decorating ideas

Effortless farmhouse bedroom decorating ideas

Truth be told, the master bedroom is always the last room I decorate. I’m not sure why, but it was time for a little refresh and some new bedding. I love vintage farmhouse style so I kept that style going into the master bedroom. I moved some things around, completed a quick furniture DIY, took my own advice to create a cozy corner, and got some new bedding! I hope my effortless farmhouse bedroom decorating ideas are inspiring and encouraging!

Effortless farmhouse bedroom decorating ideas

Simple modern farmhouse wreath

I created this modern farmhouse wreath because I’ve been dying to make one of these beauties myself. There are some lovely designs all over Pinterest and they looked easy enough, so I tried making one too. I found the huge 23 inch embroidery hoop at a craft store because all the huge brass rings were sold out everywhere else. I didn’t want to pay for shipping so I got a wood ring instead.

I could have used wire to attach the stems, but I just used green embroidery floss and it worked great. I also considered spray painting the wood a gold color to coordinate with my brushed gold accents all over the house, but kept the natural wood – it’s cozier. This wreath is so fun, pretty, easy to change, light-weight, and huge – it’s such a great statement piece.

simple modern farmhouse wreath

Easy DIY furniture makeover

My first project was to update our nightstands and dresser, just a bit. Don’t get me wrong, there was nothing wrong with the furniture and I still enjoy it’s look very much, but after ten years, I wanted a little change – so I spray painted the hardware and I wish I would have done it sooner. I also looked into changing out the legs, but it was too expensive. I also looked into installing new hardware, but my idea fell through (however, I’m keeping an eye out for just the right piece of furniture to makeover and try my idea).

easy DIY furniture makeover
Vintage farmhouse bedroom decorating ideas

Create a cozy corner in the bedroom

My husband’s great grandpa’s green leather chair is such a beauty. It has beautiful lines with nail head details, and it’s in amazing condition. The ottoman makes it an idea chair for reading or doing a devotional. So, a new corner library was created and I love the serenity of it. Just out the window is a lovely view of fields and landscape – there’s also a curvy road, but it’s not a busy road. Some people have questioned why the books are facing backwards and that’s just because I love the neutral look and the colors of worn pages so much more than I like book spines. Now, if I had a huge collection of old books, I’d definitely turn out the spines.

create a cozy corner in the bedroom

Master bedroom farmhouse bedding

I have been on the lookout for new bedding for a while, but it’s not an easy task. My husband is particular about sheets, blankets, and bedding. Keeping his preferences at the forefront of my mind, I ended up selecting a comforter. I don’t think we’ve owned a comforter for over 15 years, but this one is Hearth & Hand, and looks like linen.

master bedroom farmhouse bedding

I love the neutral grey, the texture, and tiny cross details. I think it will be wonderful as we transition into spring because it feels so light over me. During these colder months, I’ll add a thin quilt for extra warmth and weight. I can even add some springy throw pillows to brighten it up. With a neutral base, it’s so much easier to swap out blankets and pillows with each season.

Tip: Once you place a new comforter or duvet cover onto your bed, get an extension cord for your iron and iron out the wrinkles right on your bed. Be sure to keep the iron moving and to use the correct temperature for the type of fabric.


Effortless farmhouse bedroom decorating ideas

Our bedroom refresh can’t go without the mention of a few new items I scored from Target. The best part about three of these items is that I will be using them around the house to refresh other areas. Who doesn’t love shopping their house to change up a look? Here’s a list of my new items from Target:

Open weave basket with leather handles

Ceramic vase with tassel

Hearth & Hand grey comforter

White ceramic footed planter


As always, thank you so much for reading. I love hearing your comments (scroll down) and seeing your follows on Facebook and Instagram. And thank you for spreading the word – sharing is caring!

Other posts you may like:

Simple farmhouse bedroom makeover

DIY bohemian headboard

Girls bedroom – accent wall / headboard

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Create a stunning wall gallery

There is currently one photo gallery in my home. It’s large, symmetrical, and it fits great on the wall! I didn’t originally display the current artwork in the frames though, I had family photos and loved how the large prints showed my girl’s expressions so well. You can create a stunning wall gallery that is not only affordable, but one that makes a big impact!

create a stunning wall gallery

When I staged my home to sell it, the personal photos had to go into hiding. I found the current artwork for free, on The Graphics Fairy website. This talented lady has so many amazing vintage images – it’s easy to get carried away admiring the graphics. The amount of freebies she offers is amazing! The best part is that the vintage images I selected enlarged perfectly. I uploaded the images into Costco Photo and they printed the same day!

stunning wall gallery

I have received numerous compliments on these images and I still love them as a collection today! The large frames are from IKEA and they have plexi glass instead of standard glass, but you’d never know it. I hope this gallery wall concept inspires you to install your own gallery – especially now that you have an art resource with thousands of free images to choose from!


Create a stunning wall gallery

IKEA Ribba Frames: $90

The Graphics Fairy art: FREE

Photo enlargements: $36 ($3.99 ea.)

TOTAL WALL GALLERY: $126

If you love these specific graphics as much as I do, you can download them from The Graphics Fairy or here. These prints cannot be sold, but used only for personal use.


More wall gallery inspiration

Creating a wall gallery takes time, but is worth the planning and effort. There is something so special about designing a collection of art, mirrors, photography, and wall hangings that has meaning and sentiment. The display of wall art can be just as artful as the art itself. Here is some wall gallery inspiration to get you going.


As always, thank you so much for reading. I love hearing your comments (scroll down) and seeing your follows on Facebook and Instagram. And thank you for spreading the word – sharing is caring!

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How to distress glass bottles

I just love the charm that a collection of glass bottles can add to your decor. Personally, I love vintage glass and worn items. However, old, worn, and dirty vintage bottles can cost a small fortune – so to save money, but not sacrifice charm, I’m going to share how to distress glass bottles.

How to distress glass bottles
My glass bottles before they were distressed and labeled.

I first tried using sand paper to rough up the outside of a bottle, but I only had one grit of sand paper, and the little progress I made took way too long. So, I ended up using a more simple method that gave me the subtle affect I was after. This process is so easy, costs next to nothing, and you probably already have the necessary items on hand .

How to distress glass bottles

I poured about 3 tablespoons of Elmer’s glue into a paper cup, and then added about 3 tablespoons of tea – mix well . (I steeped one tea packet into a third cup of hot water to get a strong tea color.)

how to distress glass bottles
Distressed this spaghetti jar in just a few minutes!

Pour some of the mixture into the bottle and after turning the bottle around to spread the glue mixture onto the entire inside surface, just pour out the excess back into the paper cup.

French ephemera labels

Allow to dry and decorate! For some interest, I added these free French ephemera labels by the Graphics Fairy. You could age the labels too if you wanted a more authentic vintage look.

More ways to age glass bottles

For more vintage farmhouse decorating inspiration, check out my 4 easy winter decorating ideas.

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