DIY Pottery Barn Inspired Vase

DIY Pottery Barn Inspired Vase

There are several ways to upcycle empty food jars, but I hope you will love this new way that is inspired by Pottery Barn earthenware. Anytime I can get the Pottery Barn inspired look with furniture or decor, for less, I’m happy! This technique is so easy, it’s paintable, and requires no prep to the glass jars. Just wash your jars but no need to remove labels. There is something so unique and pretty about these DIY Pottery Barn inspired vases! I love that they make perfect gifts, or they can be used in your shelf styling or tabletop styling.

I created a YouTube video to show you the process and just how straight forward it is. Be sure to listen to the audio because that’s where I explain the texture and technique that you see me doing in the short video. I realize that not everyone will want to purchase the CelluClay product, and I have good news – I think the same texture can be accomplished by soaking and straining paper egg cartons, maybe newspaper as well, but then you have to add an adhesive (like glue or flour and water). I’ve seen people boil down toilette paper to create a paper mache base too, but with the history we’ve had with TP shortages, maybe stick with CelluClay. If you use a little less water, I think you can smooth the surface better after applying it to the jar. If you like an even thin layer, apply smaller amounts at a time. This will take longer, but you’ll be able to control the thickness better.

This product and craft would be fun for kids to do too. They could make a vase, let it dry, and then paint it. Or you can use a little less water and mold it into a shape – I haven’t tried this myself and you may need to have something to help prop up the final piece to hold its shape, but it could be fun to try. You could also take an old toy and cover it with CelluClay to give it a new strange life for kiddos to really use their imagination. I’m contemplating taking one of the old Barbie dolls and covering it to create a Barbie statue for Quinn – we’ll see. At any rate, your imagination is the limit and it’s a fun product to work with.


DIY Pottery Barn Inspired Vase

DIY Pottery Barn Inspired Vase

DIY Pottery Barn Inspired Vase

In case you don’t check out the video, here are the basic steps:

  • Follow the CelluClay instructions – 1 lb. of clay with 4 cups of warm water
  • Break apart large chunks of CelluClay before mixing with water
  • Use hand to blend and mix CelluClay and water
  • Once the water is even dispersed, apply handfulls to the outside of the glass jar
  • Gently press and push the mixture evenly around the glass. Be sure to cover all spots
  • Leave an uneven organic edge around the top OR create a faux lip around the top
  • Allow to completely dry, 24-48 hrs.
  • Leave natural or paint
  • The dried product isn’t waterproof, but you could try spraying it with polyurethane if you wanted it to last.

DIY Pottery Barn Inspired Vase – YouTube Tutorial


DIY Pottery Barn Inspired Vase

That’s it, so easy, right?! There are several ways to paper mache, but I really like this unique texture, it doesn’t slide off of the glass, and it’s not very messy. And I couldn’t be happier about repurposing these gallon sized pickle jars! Don’t you think a pretty vase and some flowers make a lovely gift? Be sure to subscribe for my email list and receive your free shelf styling eBook~

Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

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We haven’t had a coffee table for years! I love them, love styling them, love the function they add, but having one doesn’t always work out. Our daughters are eight and a half years apart, so we’ve had littles rolling around the ground and jumping off sofas for a while – it just didn’t make sense for the way we used our family room. Then there was the challenge of finding one I loved and was willing to pay for. For years I’ve been searching for vintage pieces to create my own coffee table, checking Facebook Marketplace for a unique piece to restore, but no luck. When I finally found one that I really liked and felt would coordinate with my coordinated living room pieces, it was way out of my budget. So, I decided to build a Pottery Barn coffee table copycat, but not from scratch. Instead, I built a simple cover that slides onto an existing tabletop that I didn’t love so much!

Building the Pottery Barn coffee table copycat was so much fun! I wasn’t too concerned if it didn’t work out because I used the most inexpensive spacer wood I could (aka lattice boards). I knew going in that the boards weren’t exactly the same size, they were rough, and uneven, but I liked those qualities about them because that meant I could easily create a unique piece that looked a little old and rustic with a modern frame. I added the decorative corners at the last minute because I think they add a little more stability to the thin wooden corners, and they add a nice finishing touch too. The best part about this Pottery Barn coffee table copycat is that it lends itself to any design you can think of, and it’s simple enough for anyone to take on.

This DIY project started with this inexpensive coffee table from Walmart. I was really only after the black metal frame and the size. It was actually less expensive for me to buy an entire coffee table over just a black frame to add my own top to. Go figure! It turned out to be better this way though, if my coffee table cover didn’t turn out, I still had a useable table, and the existing top added strength to my cover. Below I’ve included some additional coffee tables that I considered.


Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat
Walmart coffee table

Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

You may look at the affordable Walmart coffee table and think the chevron pattern looks pretty nice and the color is OK, but I was after a thicker looking top without adding a lot of weight. I also wanted to apply my custom stain color to the wood and bring in the herringbone pattern. This Pottery Barn coffee table copycat isn’t an exact match, but it’s definitely inspired and more affordable than the original. The cool part is that both of my daughters have expressed how much they like the new table – which is pretty great to me. Here’s a photo of the original coffee table in our living room before I created a simple cover for it.



Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat

Anytime someone says copycat, I feel like it’s normal to expect a duplicate. Well, I’ll be the first to tell you that I didn’t create a duplicate, it’s not perfect or exact, but the Malcolm Pottery Barn coffee table is so beautiful and timeless to me that it inspired my own similar design. I love the mix of modern black metal with the rustic worn top – it feels cozy, a little vintage, but sturdy and fresh in a way. The Malcolm coffee table is longer than mine, uses solid wood, has the designer look and details I love, but when something is outside my budget I always consider if I can make it myself. And this time I decided I would attempt something similar for a fraction of the price. Below you can see the Pottery Barn coffee table that inspired this project.



Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat – Tutorial

The cover that I built started with a piece of scrap plywood I had on hand. I used 1/2-inch plywood so that it was thick enough to nail into, but not too heavy. To get the plywood to fit the top of the coffee table, I just flipped the coffee table upside down and traced around it onto the plywood. Just cut your traced lines. Then I cut a bunch of 12-inch-long lattice pieces. I used about 14 spacer (lattice) boards for the top, and then I was able to use the trimmed off pieces to fill in the rest of the spaces. The video I made showing the process is the best way to demonstrate how the top pattern came together. I was able to use 2″ wide boards to create the border – and these boards were the same thickness as the lattice boards along the top so it doesn’t bulge over the edges at all. You can use any boards you want to wrap and frame the new cover, but I wanted to make sure the cover didn’t overlap with too much thickness away from the frame. My goal wasn’t to create something that looked made, but to create something that looked like it always was. I also found these decorative corner pieces to add a nice detail and some added security for the corners of the coffee table cover.



Once the boards were glued and nailed down (3/8″ brad nails), there were some small spaces in between some boards. The lattice boards aren’t perfectly uniform, so I used wood filler to fill some of the wider spaces. The wood filler claims it can be stained, but there are some places that didn’t stain well. Again, I wasn’t looking for perfection and this outcome didn’t ruin the overall look but be aware of my experience before you begin a similar project. I sanded the entire cover with 180 grit and then 220 grit sandpaper. Once cleaned off, I added Rove + Dwell’s Farmhouse stain. Four hours later, gently sand with a 220-grit sanding sponge, and clean off. Then, I lightly applied Varathane’s whitewash stain and immediately wiped it off. These are the two main steps to achieve my white oak looking stain color. I love the warm and worn look of it, and it’s not too dark for my taste. A matte polyurethane finish was brushed on to protect the surface.


Pottery Barn Coffee Table Copycat – Video


My Pottery Barn coffee table copycat looks great downstairs as well as upstairs – it’s nice being able to move things around when I want to. Now that I have a coffee table in front of my sofa, I’ve been enjoying the opportunity to style it. Little changes to tabletops are a great way to reuse your decor and refresh a room. I love using a tray to contain and display the decor – check out some of my favorite coffee table decor.







The surface looks old and worn but it’s so smooth and soft.

Style #1 modern farmhouse

Style #2 boho farmhouse

Style #3 vintage farmhouse

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pottery barn inspired DIY snowflake

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake

One of the only things I look forward to getting in the mail, besides packages, is the Pottery Barn catalog. I admire the clean lines, textures, and classic style that Pottery Barn offers. When I flipped through this year’s Christmas catalog, I was captivated by their snowflake wall art made of driftwood. I instantly wondered if I could replicate the look and I knew exactly who I’d give it to once finished. I had to create a video to show some of the techniques described below – sometimes it’s easier to show than explain. If you like the video, please give it a thumbs up and let me know what you think in the comments! You can also subscribe to my channel for a new decorating/DIY video each week. The video is at the end of this post.

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake Supplies:

  • 4 Lath boards (more or less depending on the size of back drop needed)
  • Smooth driftwood sticks – Dream Driftwood Co
  • Mitre box hand saw
  • Brad nail gun (half inch nails)
  • Two square dowels (the same or less thick than the driftwood sticks – I used 3/8 inch)
  • Paint (can use acrylic craft paint or whatever you have on hand)
  • Paint brush, sanding sponge, pencil, and tape measure

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Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake

My mom’s entire home is decorated in a coastal theme. Aside from her seasonal holiday decorations, her place is decked out with a beach vibe. Actually, she even decorated an entire Christmas tree with coastal ornaments and lights – it was so beautiful. In trying to decide if I should tackle this particular DIY, I sent a picture of it to my sister-in-law, Stephanie. She had the brilliant idea to make the snowflake removeable so that different decor could be layered in front of the plank backdrop. I so wish I could have done it, but I could barely create it attached to the planks! It was only tricky because I was figuring it out as I went, analyzing a photo, and guessing at what would work. So, before I list out the steps taken, I want to give you a list of my tips.

  1. You can glue the driftwood sticks onto the dowel instead of nailing them. This prevents the driftwood splitting or nailing into another nail.
  2. Make sure the brad nails are the correct length.
  3. Attach hanging hardware at the very end.
  4. Cut off the colored end of he square dowel.
  5. Wear a glove if hand-cutting every piece. I made around 74 cuts, but who’s counting?
  6. The size of the snowflake determines the size of the plank backdrop. PB has an extra plank above and below their snowflake – I chose not to.

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake Steps:

  1. Lay out driftwood pieces that are relatively the same thickness.
  2. Determine how long the main horizontal driftwood piece will be.
  3. Prepare the three longest pieces of driftwood.
  4. Make any necessary cuts to match the lengths evenly. Make 22.5 degree cuts where the four sticks meet the main horizontal stick.
  5. Set up these main pieces of your snowflake so that you can create the other pieces.
  6. Cut two stick ends at 45 degrees to make the inner points of the snowflake. Holding these ends together, line it up on the snowflake and use a pencil to mark the other two cuts at 22.5 degrees.
  7. Repeat this step until all your inner points are cut and set up on the snowflake.
  8. Measure the approximate length of one of the sticks from your inner points. Mine was 2 inches. For the outer points, I cut two inch sticks with one end cut at a 45 degree angle and the other end is flat.
  9. Once the driftwood snowflake is lined up, you can measure the width and height of it. This will help you determine the size of your plank backdrop.
  10. Once I determined the width I wanted my planks to be (lath boards), I cut the top one first (18″ long). To duplicate the Pottery Barn design, I used longer every other boards cut at 19″.
  11. Once I cut, sanded, and lined up my plank back drop, I made sure that every other board was a half inch off of the next board.
  12. Cut vertical lath boards to attach to the horizontal boards. You will attached the hanging hardware to these vertical boards at the very end. Use the brad nail gun to attach every horizontal board to the vertical ones.
  13. Then carefully flip it over and nail down the vertical board on the front side for extra support.
  14. Paint your plank back drop, let dry and paint a second coat. I ended up painting a third coat because I used inexpensive acrylic craft paint.
  15. Once the paint it completely dry, you can measure the parts of your driftwood snowflake and cut matching square dowel sticks. Cut them about an inch shorter than the driftwood so that it’s not sticking out past the driftwood.
  16. Determine where the middle stick will be, set your main horizontal dowel, make sure it’s centered, and then brad nail it to the planks. For long dowel pieces, nail the ends and center.
  17. Once the dowel is in place, you can attach the main horizontal driftwood stick. I nailed my driftwood, but glue would have been enough as the wood is light.
  18. Continue this process with the other four main pieces for the snowflake. It helps to measure the center of the main stick, then line up the driftwood to determine where the dowel will be placed. The angled cuts of the driftwood when held against the main horizontal stick will show you the angle of the dowel. There is no need to cut the dowel ends at angles because these pieces should be shorter than the driftwood.
  19. Next, cut 1.5″ pieces of dowel to go under the inner and outer points of the snowflake. First add the inner points, then finally the outer points.
  20. Check for any rough edges and sand them. Touch up any spots with paint. Measure, mark, and predrill holes to attach hanging hardware.
  21. Hang level and enjoy!

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake

Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake

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Thank you so much for checking out my Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Christmas Snowflake. I am so happy with the way it turned out and I’m excited to gift it to my mom – I think she will love it. If you enjoyed this project, you can subscribe to my email list and I’ll pop into your inbox just once a week with a new decorating/DIY post. And if you liked this Pottery Barn inspired DIY, you may also enjoy my Pottery Barn Inspired DIY Fall Garland or my Gorgeous Boho Canvas Art And DIY Frame. Let me know what you think about this driftwood snowflake down in the comments below, yeah or nay?


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